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Sit Down With Produce Pete

 

NBC's ' Produce Pete'  sits down to talk about food access issues, the New York Green Cart Initiative and his own beginnings as a street vendor.  He appears in the film THE APPLE PUSHERS (www.applepushers.com).

 

Produce Pete at Hunts Point Market, Bronx NY

 

Produce Pete NBC food contributor, talks produce with Hank Zona at the Hunts Point produce market

Pat & Pete at Eden Garden, South Orange

Pat and Produce Pete out for a fun day at Eden Garden Marketplace.  Pat's getting better at picking fresh fruits and vegetables then i am.

Produce Pete With Hank Zona At Katzman Produce

Produce Pete and Hank inside the refrigerator at Katzman Produce at the Hunts Point Market in the Bronx talking vegetables.

WNBC HOLIDAY SING ALONG

Check out video from a few years past, Merry Christmas

JEOPARDY





CLICK ON LINK ABOVE.  PRODUCE PETE A CATEGORY ON JEOPARDY??  WHO WOULD HAVE GUESSED!

Upcoming Events

Saturday, October 7th

 Meet and Greet 

Book Signing

12 noon to 3pm

Thursday November 30

University Club is more then an Architectural  Landmark  New Yorks Premier Social Club

           Produce Pete 5:30 pm



Thursday, October 26th

6:30 pm to 9 pm

An evening of good taste

Purchase tickets online

https://one.bidpal.net/eigt/ticketing(details:ticketing-summary)


CHRISTMAS NAVEL ORANGES SHOW 12/16/17

CALIFORNIA NAVEL ORANGES

        


Jumbo Navel Oranges

A lot of people understand that fresh oranges are best in the winter, but not many people understand that different varieties have particular seasons. You'll have better luck coming home with good oranges if you learn which varieties are in season when 

 and keep a simple guideline in mind when you're selecting them at the market. Oranges and all citrus fruit should be heavy in the hand for its size. This simple test and it's your most reliable guide for citrus fruit. 


Varieties

The two most familiar varieties are navel and Valencia oranges, which are very good, but if you limit yourself to them, you're missing out on some real treats. 

Navel California Oranges are considered by many to be the best oranges in the world for eating out of hand. They have a meaty flesh, their thick rinds are easy to peel, the segments separate easily, and they have no seeds. All navel oranges have a navel at the blossom end - an opening with a convoluted interior that looks, well, like a navel. Some have a very small navel; others have a larger one. If you're in doubt, inspect several in the bin. A quick poll will identify the variety. 

California navel oranges usually arrive around the second week of November and go through late spring. They're not that great at the extreme ends of the season. The earliest ones have less orange color and less sweetness. In February, March, and April, the peak months, California navels get very sweet. Late in the season they are likely to be dry, puffy, and expensive. Avoid them as summer comes on; look for summer fruits instead. 

It's not always safe to assume that a Florida orange is a Valencia juice orange and a California orange is a navel. Florida also grows navel oranges, which are on the market between late fall and the end of January. The Florida navel doesn't have as much color as the California variety. They come in all sizes - from tennis-ball to softball size. The rind will be bronze to light orange, with a richer orange color later in the season. Florida navels are, of course, seedless, but they have higher juice content and a thinner rind that's not as easy to peel as the California navels. Despite their relatively pale color, they're good oranges and very sweet. Here again, check the blossom end. If it's stamped Florida but has a navel, it's a navel orange. 


Selecting Oranges

Whatever the variety, look for oranges that are shiny and heavy in the hand. It's a primary rule for a number of fruits, but it's especially important for oranges. Check the scent - the orange should smell good. Except for Robinson tangerines, the rind should never feel puffy - that is, it shouldn't feel like there's any space between it and the flesh. There should be no spotting, no signs of shriveling, no white patches on the rind, and no fermented smell. 


Storing Oranges

Tangerines are the most perishable of the oranges. They will keep a day or two at room temperature and up to a week in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. Other oranges can be kept out at room temperature for three or four days with little problem. Refrigerate them in a plastic bag or in the crisper drawer, and they'll keep well for one to two weeks. 

 

         A CHRISTMAS STORY


  As a child growing up I came from a very loving family, but to say the least we didn't have much, but there was always food on the table. Pop was a fruit peddler and mom did her best to stretch every dollar. 

The whole family worked hard and to tell you the truth I never really realized that we were poor. Come Christmas mom would always try to make it special for me and my younger brother David. she would wrap navel oranges ( exotic in my day) in foil and christmas paper and put them in our christmas stocking. 

I grew up in the north east and apples were plentiful, but oranges came from california and florida, and we didn't see them much, so this was a big treat for us. So in my mom's memory every year on the show I do California Navel Oranges at Christmas time and I wrap them in foil and christmas paper, as a tribute to this wonderful women, I called MOM. 


 MERRY CHRISTMAS, HAPPY HOLIDAY TO ALL FROM MY FAMILY TO YOURS



  

    

ANDY BOY BROCCOLI RABE SHOW 12/23/17








                  ANDY BOY BROCCOLI RABE



Broccoli rabe is a nonheading variety of broccoli that's also known as broccoletti di rape, brocoletto, rapini, choy sum, or Chinese flowering cabbage. It has long, thin, leafy stalks topped with small florets that look like tiny broccoli florets. The florets or flowers are quite delicate; the leaves slightly bitter.

Once highly prized by the Romans and cultivated all over the southern Mediterranean, broccoli rabe didn't appear in more northern areas of Europe until the sixteenth century, and didn't appear in North America until the 1920's, when Italian farmers brought it to the United States. For years broccoli rabe was favored mainly in the Italian and Asian communities here. In the old days broccoli rabe was a staple and sold for twenty-five cents a pound, maybe ten cents a pound. In my father's family broccoli rabe was used to flavor all kinds of filling dishes when meat was just too expensive. They'd have it with pasta, with potatoes--they'd even make broccoli rabe sandwiches! They had it so much that my father once swore he'd never eat it again. Now it's a yuppie food that shows up in trendy restaurants and fetches $2.99 a pound at the market.

Even though it's a little pricey now, broccoli rabe is still a great vegetable. It packs a wallop and has a bitter zest that gives a real lift to bland foods.

Broccoli rabe is most plentiful between late fall and early spring. It is grown in various places all over the continent, including Quebec, California, Arizona, and other states, so it's usually available year round, except for a couple of months in midsummer--usually June and July.

Selecting


At the market you'll usually find broccoli rabe displayed in a refrigerator case sprinkled with ice because it wilts very easily. Choose firm, green, small stems with compact heads. Like broccoli, the flower buds that make up the florets should be tightly closed and dark green, not open or yellow. The Any Boy label is the top of the line when it comes to broccoli rabe and should be bought whenever 

Storing


Store broccoli rabe in your refrigerator crisper unwashed, either wrapped in a wet towel or in a plastic bag. It will keep two or three days. For longer storage, blanch and freeze.

Preparing


To prepare, rinse thoroughly in cold water, shake off, and cut off the bottoms of the stalks (they're too tough to eat). Broccoli rabe is much better cooked than raw. Raw, it's very bitter but has no other flavor. Even a light steaming brings out its distinctive taste. As a side vegetable, broccoli rabe yields only about one serving per pound because it cooks way down. You can cook it like broccoli, but whether you braise, saute, boil, or steam it, you only need to cook it for eight to ten minutes. Most Italians like broccoli rabe al dente--cooked about six minutes. You can steam it in water or chicken broth, or saute it with oil and garlic. Some people like it as a cold salad, steamed then cooled and dressed with oil, hot peppers, garlic, and other seasonings. For terrific potatoes, add steamed broccoli rabe to boiled potatoes and dress with olive oil and garlic. Broccoli rabe also makes a great sauce for pasta when steamed and combined with olive oil, garlic, and hot sausage. 

HALOS MANDARIN SHOW 12/09/17

 ORANGES IN THE MANDARIN FAMILY INCLUDE TANGERINES, TANGELOS, MINEOLAS ( RED TANGELO), MURCOTTS, TEMPLES, CLEMENTINES, AND MANDARINS- GRANDMOTHER OF THEM ALL. THEY ARE BASICALLY PEELING ORANGES THAT BEGAN AS SMALL, BITTER FRUITS AND HAVE BEEN DEVELOPED BY HORTICULTURALISTS INTO SWEET, EASILY PEELED AND EATEN ORANGES. THE MANDARIN ORANGE ORIGINATED IN THE FAR EAST AND HAS BEEN AROUND SINCE 2000 BC. IF YOU’VE NEVER SEEN A FRESH MANDARIN, YOU ARE IN FOR A SURPRISE- THE RIND IS A BRILLANT EMERAL GREEN, AND THE FLESH IS A BEAUTIFUL DEEP ORANGE. IN THE UNITED STATES MANDARINS ARE GROWN IN FLORIDA AND CALIFORNIA, BUT THEY’RE NOT OFTEN AVAILABLE FRESH BECAUSE CANNERS BUY THEM UP. THE FLAVOR OF A FRESH MANDARIN IS MUCH BETTER THEN THAT OF THE CANNED HOWEVER. THE FLESH IS SEMISWEET WITH NO NETTING AND NO SEEDS. A LOT OF PEOPLE PASS THEM BY IN THE STORES BECAUSE THEY THINK THAT THEY ARE GREEN ORANGES- THAT IS, UNTIL THEY CUT INTO SOME AND HAVE A TASTE. THEN THEY COME BACK FOR MORE. WHEN MANDARINS ARE AVAILABLE, YOU’LL FIND THEM IN PRODUCE MARKETS OR THE PRODUCE SECTION OF YOUR SUPER MARKET IN LATE FALL. THEY ARE AVAILABLE FOR TWO OR THREE MONTHS, BUT LATER IN THE SEASON THERE IS HEAVY COMPETITION FROM THE CANNERS. DON’T PASS UP FRESH MANDARINS IF YOU SEE THEM

.   THE HALOS, IS A BRAND NAME FOR A VARIETY OF MANDARIN. THE ONES YOU SEE IN THE STORES FROM NOVEMBER TO JANUARY ARE THE CLEMENTINE VARIETY AND THE ONES YOU SEE IN THE STORES FROM FEBRUARY TO APRIL ARE THE W. MURCOTT AFOURERS VARIETY. HALOS ARE 100% CALIFORNIAN! THEY’RE GROWN IN THE RICH, FERTILE SOIL OF THE SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, WHERE ABUNDANT SUNSHINE MAKES THEM SWEET AND DELICIOUS. EVEN THOUGHT THE HALO IS A MANDARIN, NOT EVERY MANDARIN IS A HALO, THAT’S BECAUSE EVERY HALO NEEDS TO MEET THREE REQUIREMENTS, EASY TO PEEL, SEEDLESS, AND SUPER SWEET. HALOS ARE ALL NATURAL, NON GMO ( NON-GENETICALLY MODIFIED) AND JUST THE RIGHT SIZE FOR KIDS LUNCH BOXES AND FAMILIES ON THE GO, THEY’RE NATURES PERFECT TREAT.

 THE SEASON FOR BOTH VARITIES OF HALOS LAST FROM NOVEMBER TO MAY, QUITE A LONG SEASON FOR SUCH A GREAT ORANGE. HALOS ARE RICH IN VITAMINES, MINERALS, DIETARY FIBER AND A VARIETY OF ANTIOXIDANT COMPOUNDS. THEY ARE ALSO AN EXCELLENT SOURCE OF VITAMIN C, KIDS LOVE THEM AND SO DO ADULTS, SO WHAT COULD BE BETTER, HEALTHY AND THEY TASTE GOOD TO.

 WHEN SELECTING HALOS OR ANY ORANGES, LOOK FOR THEM TO SHINY AND HEAVY IN THE HAND, IT’S A PRIMARY RULE FOR A NUMBER OF FRUITS ESPECIALLY CITRUS. CHECK THE SCENT- THE ORANGE SHOULD SMELL GOOD, FRESH AND NON ACIDIC. THERE SHOULD BE NO SPOTTING, NO SIGN OF SHRIVELING, NO WHITE PATCHES ON THE RIND AND MOST IMPORTANT NO FERMEMTED SMELL.

 TO KEEP HALOS DELICIOUS AND JUICY, STORE THEM IN THE REFRIGERATOR . THEY’LL STAY SWEET AND READY TO EAT FOR UP TO TWO WEEKS

. WITH THE HOLIDAYS COMING UP HALOS ARE GREAT FOR STOCKING STUFFERS OR WHEN FRIENDS AND FAMILY ARE OVER FOR THE HOLIDAYS!


     SO FROM MY FAMILY TO YOURS, ENJOY THE HOLIDAY SEASON AND ENJOY THE RICHNESS OF THE HALO “ A GREAT WINTERY TREAT” 

 

   PRODUCE PETE    

It's Apple Season!!!!!

Apple Country

  I love apple season. There are few things better than a good apple eaten out of hand. Whether the flesh is mild and sweet or tart and winey, when you bite into it, a fresh-picked apple will make a crisp cracking sound and you’ll get a spurt of juice.  There’s a season for everything and the main season for American apples starts the last half of October. I’ve probably said this a thousand times, but our problem in the United States is that we try to buy produce out of season. Many varieties will keep well late into winter, but by summer most apples have been stored for seven or eight months. No wonder they are soft, mealy, and without juice. When peaches and melons come in, stay away from apples. Come back when there’s a snap in the air, and you’ll remember what makes apples so good. Apples are one of the most esteemed fruits in the northern Hemisphere in part because they’re so versatile. They’re delicious raw, baked, dried, or made into apple sauce. They make great pies, apple butter, apple jelly, chutney, cider, and cider vinegar, and they’re a welcome addition to dozens of other dishes. A member of the rose family, apples have been known since ancient times and were cultivated by the Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans. Many places grow wonderful apples now, but overall, the United States produces the finest apple crops in the world. The Northwest, the East Coast, and parts of the Midwest, regions where the seasons change, grow the best apples. They’re not a fruit for hot climates. Only a few of the thousands of varieties of apples grown today are mass marketed, but there are many more out there than Red Delicious, Golden Delicious and Macs. There are very old and very new varieties you may never have heard of. If you’re north of the Mason-Dixon Line, you’re going to find the best apples at local farm markets and stands, where they’re fresh-picked, and you’re likely to find great varieties you’d never see at the supermarket.   

Season The vast majority of apples are picked from September through November and either sold immediately or put into cold storage, where some keep well – some don’t. The peak of the season for domestic varieties – when most stored apples still retain their snap – is generally over by December. A few will last through the early spring, but by March it’s hard even to find a good Winesap.   

Selecting In most cases look for very firm, bright-colored fruit with no bruises and with the stem still on – a good indication that you’ve got an apple that’s not overripe. The apple should feel heavy in the hand for its size and have a good shine on it. A dull look usually means the fruit has been in storage too long, although some excellent varieties like Winesaps and eastern Golden Delicious have relatively rough skin with little or no sheen. As always, use your nose. An apple that smells great is going to taste great.  

 Varieties 

Honeycrisp: Sometimes the name of an apple says it all. Honeycrisp apples are honey sweet (with a touch of tart) and amazingly crisp, some say “explosively crisp.” It’s easy to see why this new variety continues to grow in popularity since its 1991 introduction in Minnesota. Supplies are limited for now but more Honeycrisp trees are being planted every year.    

  Empire: With the popular Red Delicious and McIntosh for parents, Empire apples were destined to be a hit. It’s a sweet-tart combination that’s great for everything. The New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva Introduced this new variety in 1966.  

  McIntosh: Nothing evokes Fall better than the aromatic fragrance of McIntosh apples. People have enjoyed this apple since 1811 when John McIntosh discovered the first seedling. McIntosh apples grow particularly well in New York’s cool climate!       

  Macoun: Want a perfect no-fat dessert that will satisfy your sweet tooth? Macoun may just be your apple, but, hurry, these special apples are only available in the Fall. Macoun was developed at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva in 1932. It’s named for a famous Canadian fruit breeder.  


CHRISTMAS PEARS 11/25/17 SHOW

COMICE AND OTHER CHRISTMAS PEARS



          Cultivated for nearly four thousand years, pears have been known to man since ancient times. They originated in Asia and spread throughout Europe during the Roman Empire. Until the sixteenth century pears were tough and always eaten cooked, but in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, gardeners for European noblemen began to crossbreed varieties, competing with each other to get a pear with a soft, buttery flesh. Most of the pears we know today are derived from those cultivars.  Pears are grown throughout the United States and Europe and are now being introduced as commercial crops in South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and Chile. In the United States, Oregon, Washington, and California produce particularly excellent pears.  This is one fruit you do not want tree-ripened. Pears have a characteristically gritty texture caused by cells in the flesh called stone cells. Although more and more of these have been bred out, all varieties still contain them. Picking pears before the fruit has matured and holding them under controlled conditions prevents the formation of too many stone cells.  Pears are delicate even when they're hard and green, so they're always picked by hand. Most markets don't sell really ripe pears because they bruise so easily, but it's very easy to ripen them at home.  

Varieties

Because they crossbred so easily, there are somewhere between four thousand and five thousand cultivated varieties. Three of those are commonly available to shoppers here.  COMICE PEARS : A very large, round, short-necked pear, the Comice is my personal favorite. Of all the pears, I think it's the sweetest and most fragrant. Comice pears have a greenish yellow skin, sometimes with a red blush. Originally a French variety, they have been grown in North  America for more than one hundred years. Because they scar very easily, they're sometimes hard to sell here. Ethnic groups buy them, but a lot of Americans just don't like the way they look. With a peak season in November and December, they're one of the best things going around the holiday season. As the demand for them grows, producers are starting to grow more of them, but Comices are still not as commonly available as Bartlett’s and Anjou’s, so they're still relatively expensive. Comice pears are available from August to March.  ANJOU PEARS : Anjou pears are almost always oval, with a very short neck. Immature Anjou’s are pale green and turn yellowish green as they ripen. They have a very juicy, spicy flesh that's a bit firmer than the Bartlett. Anjou’s are available from October through May.  BOSC PEARS : Although similar in appearance to the European Conference pear, the Bosc is much juicer and less granular in texture. It is relatively long and slender; of all the pears, it probably has the longest neck. An unripe Bosc has a brown skin that changes to a golden russet, becoming lighter and brighter in color as it ripens. A ripe Bosc can get almost golden yellow, but it will still retain shades of russet. The Bosc has a yellow flesh that's buttery, sweet, and juicy. It has a very long season - August through May.  

Selecting

Green pears should be free from blemishes. Ripe pears - especially tender varieties like the Comice - are going to show a few scars. Avoid bruised or too-soft fruit, but don't be afraid to bring home pears that are still green. That's the way you're going to find most of them.  

Ripening and Storing

Place unripe pears in a bowl or paper bag, leave them at room temperature, and they'll ripen in a few days to a week, depending on how green they are when you buy them.  Most pears show a subtle change in color as they ripen, and some develop a sweet fragrance. You can test a pear for ripeness by applying gentle pressure to the stem end with your thumb - it should yield a bit. You can hold off the ripening process by refrigerating them, and they'll hold for a long time - as long as three to four weeks. A few days before you want to eat them, bring them out to ripen. You can refrigerate a ripe pear too, but at that point it's only going to last a couple days.  

Preparing

There are lots of ways to eat pears. They're good with prosciutto. You can use them in any recipe that calls for apples. Use several different varieties, all on the green side, to make a terrific pie. My aunt used to make pear pies just like apple pies, mixing in one or two quinces. You can poach pears and serve them with strawberry sauce for a simple, very pretty dessert that tastes great.  During the holidays, line a basket with napkins, pile up Comices or Forelles or a mix, tuck in sprigs of holly and maybe a few ornaments, and you'll have a pretty centerpiece that's also a good way to ripen the fruit.     
















CHRISTMAS TREES SHOW 12/02/17

  

Produce Pete's Christmas 2017

Christmas is the most widely celebrated festival world over. Santa riding on a reindeer and a sleigh with his bag full of gifts, candies and fruit. A green Christmas tree decorated with tinsel and a star, gingerbread houses, holly and mistletoe, these are all a sign that Christmas is here.  In the 1800's, two more Christmas customs became popular-decorating Christmas trees and sending Christmas cards to relatives and friends. Many well-known Christmas carols, including "Silent Night" and "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing", were composed during this period. In the United States and other countries, Santa Claus replaced Saint Nicholas as the symbol of gift giving. 

 

The Most Popular Christmas Trees and Their Distinctive Qualities                                         

The Balsam and Fraser Firs

All firs have soft, flattened needles. Depending on species, the needles vary in length. All types of firs are characterized by their pleasant fragrance. Their needles are always dark green. The balsam fir (Abies balsa mea) and Fraser fir (Abies fraseri) are respectively the most popular and the second most popular Christmas tree in Canada. The balsam fir is found in cooler climates and is therefore found in abundance in Canada.

 The Fraser fir is very similar in form and appearance to balsam fir. It is found abundantly in Canada and in some regions of the United States.

  To grow, both types of trees demand abundant soil moisture and humid atmosphere. Growth is best on well-drained soils that are somewhat acid.  

The Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris) is the third most popular Christmas tree in Canada. It grows in a wide variety of soils and sites. The tree was originally introduced in Canada by European settlers. 

 It is renowned for its dark green foliage and its excellent needle retention. 

 White Spruce (Pices gluaca) is a conifer found throughout Canada. Its cone-shaped crown along with its spreading branches gives it a nice appearance which makes it a good Christmas tree. 

 White spruce has excellent foliage color, short stiff needles and a good natural shape.

  About forty million real Christmas trees are sold in North America every year. Of these, five to six million are grown in Canada. A real Christmas tree is part of the Christmas tradition and contributes to making Christmas a real and meaningful experience.

  Many are said to be using artificial trees to save our forests. The truth is, however, that almost all trees harvested in Canada are grown on Christmas tree farms. Thanks to the annual demand for Christmas trees, thousands of acres of otherwise unfarmed land is being farmed. Indeed, Christmas tree farms are most often located on land which could not be used to grow other farm products (these farms are on barren slopes or under power lines). In addition, for each tree harvested, about ten others are being grown on farms to prepare for the next ten harvest seasons. 

 Christmas trees have positive effects on the environment:

  · They produce oxygen and rid the air of carbon dioxide, thereby reducing the earth warming greenhouse effect. 

 · They improve soil stability. 

 · They provide an aesthetically pleasing improvement to the land and bring value to portions of land which could not be used to grow other crops. 

 · They serve as wildlife habitat.

  · They are naturally biodegradable.

  · They are a renewable resource.  Many people wrongly believe that a Christmas tree can be the cause of a fire. Of course, this can't be true. A Christmas tree which is well cared for will remain fresh and will not catch fire unless a strong flame supported by inflammable material is placed under the tree. In fact, there were examples of houses which burned completely while having a real Christmas tree which did not even catch fire. 

 Other people have mentioned that real Christmas trees dry up and leave needles on their carpets after the Christmas season is over. Fresh trees don't shed needles. Kept in water, it is not unusual for Christmas trees to last two months or more in your home shedding very few needles.

  How to choose the best tree and how to ensure that your tree will stay as fresh and safe as when you bought it are questions often asked from Christmas tree producers. Here is some useful advice: 

 · When buying your tree, do a freshness test. Grasp a branch between your thumb and forefinger and pull it toward you. If the tree is fresh, no more than 5-10 needles should come off in your hand. 

 · Once your tree is purchased, keep it in a sheltered, unheated area such as a porch or garage to protect it from the wind until you are ready to decorate it.  · Before installing the tree in your home, cut the butt end of your tree 2 centimeters (1 inch) above the original cut and immediately place the tree in a tree stand that holds a minimum of four liters of water.

  · Do not leave your tree without water-check the water level of your tree stand every day to ensure that the tree never runs out of water. A new tree will absorb 4 liters of water on the first day and will thereafter consume about one liter of water per day. If your tree runs out of water (for a period exceeding two hours), make another straight cut across the base of the trunk. Water is important because it prevents the needles from drying and dropping off and maintains the fragrance of the tree.  · In addition, keep your tree away from heat and draft sources like fireplaces, radiators and television sets. Test your light cords and connections before hanging them on the tree to make sure they're in good working order. You don't want to use cords with cracked insulation or broken or empty sockets. Also be sure to unplug the lights before you go to bed or leave the house. Never overload electrical circuits. 

 · The Canadian Christmas Tree Growers Association recommends using tree stands that can hold six liters of water or more.  


Christmas Tree Safety

Tips

· Always choose a freshly cut tree. To test a tree, strike the stump down on a firm surface. If needles fall off, the tree is too dry.

  · Consider buying a live tree instead. You can plant it later to enjoy it for years to come. 

 · When you are ready to set the tree up cut off 1/2 to 1 inch from the bottom of the tree before placing in the stand which should be filled with hot water (not boiling, but around 130-160 F) as soon as the tree is set up. 

 · The tree could absorb as much as a gallon of water the first day.

  · Use wire or nylon cord to secure the tree to the wall or ceiling to prevent it from being knocked over by children or pets. 

 · Place the tree away from heat sources and, of course, from sparks and open flame. 

 · Always keep the tree well watered. Check and refill often. 

 · Use only noncombustible decorations

.  · Check and replace any worn or damaged light sets. It is a good practice to replace any set that is more than four or five years old.

  · Use only U.L. or F.M. approved light strings; Spot or floodlights should only be used on an artificial tree; NO CANDLES!

  · Avoid overloading electrical circuits or creating "octopus" connections. 

 · Make sure there is an operational smoke detector installed nearby.

  · Do not burn tree branches in the fireplace-it could throw off a large amount of heat and cause a fire. Christmas trees also cause an oily soot which may damage the fireplace.  


Selection

· Don't get carried away with tree size! Choose a tree at least one foot less than the ceiling height. Room is needed to place the tree in the stand and place decorations on top of the tree. 

 · Make sure the bottom of the tree is long enough to be placed in the stand. About an inch must be cut off the bottom when setting the tree up in the home

 The tree should not be wilted. Also run your hand over the branches. The needles should not come off, break, or be brittle.

  · Check for insects. Shake the tree or use compressed air to blow them out. 


 

HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM MY FAMILY TO YOURS!

"PRODUCE PETE"

BETTE'S HOMEMADE RECIPES

GRANDMA ALBERTELLI'S

  

Broccoli Rabe Pie

Ingredients


  • ½ pound broccoli rabe 
  • 1 small onion, diced 
  • 1 garlic clove, diced 
  • ¼  pound sausage, no casing 
  • ½  pound ricotta cheese (whole milk) 
  • ¼ cup shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 2 tablespoons grated cheese 
  • 1 egg
  • 2 pie crusts for bottom and top
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil 

Preparing

Sauté garlic and oil until lightly browned and add broccoli rabe; sauté until tender. Strain the broccoli rabe and garlic mixture to remove the excess liquid. Chop the mixture finely, and set aside for later use. Cook the sausage meat and the diced onions until the mixture is fully cooked.  Drain the sausage mixture of any excess liquid.  Make sure the sausage and onion mixture is chopped, without any large pieces of meat. Add sausage mixture to the broccoli rabe mixture.  Blend well.  Next, add the ricotta, mozzarella, grated cheese and egg.   Stir until mixed well.  Add broccoli rabe and sausage mixture to the pie crust, and distribute evenly.  Add pie crust over the top.  Cut a vent hole in the center of the pie. Pinch the edges of the two crusts together. Brush the top of the pie and the edges with a beaten egg yolk.    Place pie on a cookie sheet, and bake at 375° for 45 minutes to an hour, or until golden brown. Let it sit for 5 minutes before serving.  

BETTE' BROCCOLI SALAD

  

Broccoli Salad

Yield: 8 servings

Salad Ingredients


  • 2 heads broccoli, cut into small pieces 
  • 1/2 cup golden raisins or dried cranberries      
  • 1/2 small onion, red or white, diced     
  • 1/2 pound bacon, cooked and crumbled     
  • 3/4 cup of cashew nuts

Dressing Ingredients


  • 1-1/4 cups mayonnaise 
  • 3-4 tablespoons red wine or balsamic  vinegar     
  • 1/3 cup sugar 

Preparing

In a large bowl, mix together all the salad ingredients. In a small bowl, whisk together the dressing ingredients. Pour over broccoli and stir until well coated.  Chill and serve.     

MOM'S BEST

  

Mama Louise’s Escarole n' Beans

Ingredients


  • 2 heads escarole 
  • 1/4 cup olive oil 
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped 
  • 2 cans Cannellini beans 
  • 1/2 teaspoon hot red crushed pepper   
  • Salt & pepper to taste 

Preparing

Cut bottom core off escarole and rinse leaves well.  In a large pot, put in escarole leaves and add 4 cups of water; steam until leaves are tender.  Drain in colander and set aside. Place olive oil and garlic in the same pot and sauté garlic until golden brown. Add escarole and the remaining ingredients into the pot and stir. Heat thoroughly.     

Bette's Broccoli Rabe and Sausage

  

  

Broccoli Rabe & Sausage

Ingredients


  • 2 pounds broccoli rabe (Approximately  2 Bunches)
  • 1/4 cup olive oil 
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced      
  • 1 pound sausage, hot or sweet 
  • ½ teaspoon hot red crushed pepper      
  • Salt & pepper to taste 
  • Cooked pasta (optional) 

Preparing

In a large frying pan, brown sausage. After sausage is cooked, cut into approximately 1/4" circular pieces and set aside. 

Cut off about 2 inches from the bottom stem of the broccoli rabe; rinse well and drain. In a large pot, put in broccoli rabe and add approximately 4 cups of water, cover and steam on medium-high until tender, stirring occasionally.  In colander, drain broccoli rabe and set aside. In the same empty pot put in oil and garlic and sauté garlic until lightly browned. Add broccoli rabe, sausage, crushed red pepper, salt and pepper to the sautéed garlic and oil and stir together. If desired, place broccoli rabe over cooked pasta and serve. 

BETTE'S HOLIDAY RECIPES

Bette's Pear Cobbler

   Pear Cobbler 

  Ingredients:

 · 2 to 2 1/2 cups sliced fresh pears

 · 2 cups sugar, divided

 · 4 ounces butter 

· 3/4 cup flour

 · 2 teaspoons baking powder

 · 1 teaspoon cinnamon

 · 1/4 teaspoon salt

 · 3/4 cup milk

 · 1 egg 

  Preparation:

 Mix pears with 1 cup sugar and let stand. Put butter in 2-quart casserole and place in 325° oven until melted. Combine all dry ingredients, including the remaining 1 cup of sugar. Mix well. Whisk together the milk and egg; slowly combine with dry ingredients to make a batter. Pour over melted butter. Do not stir. Spoon pears over the batter. Do not stir. Bake at 325° for 50 to 60 minutes, or until nicely browned and pears are tender.
Serve hot or cold with ice cream or whipped cream.     
































ARTICHOKES

Bette's Artichokes


4 medium-sized artichokes

 2 cups breadcrumbs

 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese

 1 tablespoon garlic powder

 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, melted

 ¼ cup water

3/4 cup olive oil

 2 tablespoons parsley flakes

Preparing

Rinse the artichokes well, remove the small outer leaves from the bottom row around artichoke, cut off the stem and slice about 1 inch off of the top. In a large bowl, combine the breadcrumbs, Parmesan cheese, garlic powder, and pepper. Add the melted butter, water and oil and mix well.  If needed, add more water or oil to make stuffing very moist.Turn the artichokes upside down and press firmly to spread the leaves. Turn right side up and stand the artichokes in a large pot with about 1 ½ inches of water in the bottom. Cover and steam over medium-high heat about 20-25 minutes or until the artichokes are tender, checking the water level occasionally and adding more water as needed.  Stuff the breadcrumb mixture into the center and inside surrounding layers of leaves.  Put onto microwavable plate and microwave for approximately 3-4 minutes or before serving put into pan covered tightly with foil and place in 350° oven for approximately 20 minutes.
 

NAVEL ORANGE CAKE

 

Navel Orange Cake


Ingredients


  • 1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter 
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3 cups sugar 
  • 1 cup sour cream 
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 
  • 6 eggs 
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 
  • Orange rind of one orange – grated
  • 5 tablespoons fresh navel orange juice

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

Butter and flour a tube pan and set aside.

In a large bowl, cream butter and sugar together and then add sour cream. Sift flour and baking soda together. Add to creamed mixture, alternately with eggs, one at a time, beating after each addition. Add extract, navel orange rind, navel orange juice and stir to combine. Pour into prepared pan and bake for 1 hour and 10 minutes. Cool cake in pan for about 10 minutes and then unmold and cool completely on a wire rack.

Icing

· 1 ½ cups confection sugar

· Fresh navel orange juice

· 1 tablespoon navel orange rind, grated

Mix together with a whisk until it has a thick liquid consistency. Drizzle over cake when it is still warm.

RICOTTA COOKIES

.
 Lemon Ricotta Cookies


  • 2 1/2 cups  all purpose flower
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 stick unsalted butter softened
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 (15-ounce) container  whole milk ricotta cheese
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 lemon, zested

Glaze:

  • 1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 lemon, zested

Directions Preheat the oven to 375 degrees, In a medium bowl combine the flour, baking powder, and salt. Set aside.In the large bowl combine the butter and the sugar. Using an electric mixer beat the butter and sugar until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add the eggs, 1 at a time, beating until incorporated. Add the ricotta cheese, lemon juice, and lemon zest. Beat to combine. Stir in the dry ingredients.Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Spoon the dough (about 2 tablespoons for each cookie) onto the baking sheets. Bake for 15 minutes, until slightly golden at the edges. Remove from the oven and let the cookies rest on the baking sheet for 20 minutes.Glaze:Combine the powdered sugar, lemon juice, and

lemon zest in a small bowl and stir until smooth. Spoon about 1/2-teaspoon onto each cookie and use the back of the spoon to gently spread. Let the glaze harden for about 2 hours. Pack the cookies into a decorative container. 

NAVEL ORANGE CHEESE CAKE

      

NAVEL ORANGE CHEESECAKE


10 servings

Crust Ingredients

· 1 3/4 cups vanilla wafer crumbs 

· 1/4 cup chopped walnuts 

· 1 teaspoons ground cinnamon 

· 1/2 cup butter or margarine, melted

 

Filling Ingredients

· 3 eggs 

· 1/4 teaspoon salt 

· 1 pound cream cheese, at room temperature 

· 1 cup sugar 

· 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 

· 2 teaspoons orange extract

· 3 cups sour cream 

· orange segments cut into pieces

· whole orange segments for topping


Preparing


Preheat the oven to 375°F. 

In a bowl, mix together all the crust ingredients, then press on the bottom and sides of an 8 or 9 inch spring form pan. 

In a large bowl, beat the eggs, salt, cream cheese, sugar, vanilla and orange extract until smooth. Blend in the sour cream and cut orange segments.  Pour the filling into the prepared crust and bake for 35 minutes, or until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean. 

Top with orange segments and chill for approximately 3 hours.
 

HALO CHOCOLATE DIP


    HALO CHOCOLATE DIP MANDARINS 


  INGREDIENTS:

 6  Halo Mandarin orange, peeled and separated

 3/4  cup dark chocolate chips

 1  teaspoon coarse sea salt

 3  tablespoon chopped walnuts (optional) 

  INSTRUCTIONS:

 · Line a large plate with a piece of wax paper or parchment paper.

 · Pour chocolate chips in a shallow, microwaveable bowl or mug

. · Heat on high for 30 seconds; then stir. Microwave for additional 20 seconds and stir again. Repeat until chips are melted and smooth.

 · Dip each mandarin wedge into the chocolate, shaking off excess. Lay on prepared plate.

 · Once all oranges are dipped, sprinkle with several grains of salt or pieces of walnuts.

 · Allow oranges to harden, about 1.5 hours. Recommend eating them on the same day of preparation.  

   ( Adjust amount of Halos for serving size)      

About Us

 Managed and operated a family owned farm/produce business for retail, wholesale, and fruit baskets. Pete has been in the produce business his whole life, and started out selling produce off the back of a truck at auctions and at his parents' roadside stand. Pete's family has been in business since 1953 at the same location in Bergenfield, New Jersey. From 1971 - 1997 Pete owned and operated this family "seasonal" business that includes at Christmas - Christmas trees, wreaths, and fruit baskets. During Easter we sell various plants, gourmet baskets and fruit baskets - Mother's Day - plants, fresh cut flowers, fruit baskets. At Halloween - pumpkins, corn stalks, etc. The produce store is open between April and December with retail, wholesale, and fruit baskets.

"KNOW A LITTLE ABOUT A LOT". JACK OF ALL TRADES MASTER OF NONE.....

In January 1998 he turned over the business to his son Peter Charles making him the 3rd generation to own Napolitano's Produce. In April of 2006, Napolitano's Produce closed it's doors after 53 years, a sad day but everything comes to an end. I would like to thank all the faithful customers who shopped my family store over the past 53 years. It was a privilege serving you. In June 2000 - he started as a Fruit & Vegetable Buyer for S. Katzman Produce at Hunts Point Market, Bronx, New York.Pete comes from a large family with his father being the 20th child - "That's why we are in the food business".

  • In April 1989, with the Chilean grape scare, he was hired by "People Are Talking" WORTV Channel 9, super station - nationwide - 150 markets - 24 million viewers and became "Pete Your Produce Pal" on daily five days a week.
  • In December 1990 hired by NBC for "House Party" as "Pete the Prince of Produce". Group W
  • In September 1991 hired by WORTV Channel 9 for "Nine Broadcast Plaza" as "Pete Your Produce Pal".
  • In September 1992 hired by WNBC Channel 4 "Weekend Today in New York" show with 52 week contract as "Produce Pete" / "Pete Your Produce Pal". (Been there ever since)
  • In 1994 he wrote a book about produce tips called "Produce Pete's Farmacopeia" - William Morrow, publisher
  • In September 1995 Discovery Channel - "Home Matters"
  • In January 1997 CNBC - "Steals and Deals"
  • In January 1998 Bionova Produce / Masters Touch Spokesperson
  • In January 2000 NBC - Ainsley Harriot Show (National - Buena Vista)
  • In February 2000 Woman's Home Network with Joan Lunden
  • In September 2000 hired by WCAU Philadelphia 10 as Produce Pete (Sunday & Wednesday Segments)
  • In February 2001 - Pathmark Supermarkets - Spokesperson
  • Guest on numerous Radio and Television shows.
  • In February 2001 "Produce Pete's Farmacopeia"- Republished by iuniverse.com
  • In July 2004 - The View (ABC 7)
  • In February 2005- Bella Vita Spokesperson (In Italy)
  • In July 2006 - NBC Today Show (Nationally)
  • In August 2007 Italian American Network (Produce Pete picks of the week)
  • Numerous Weekend Farmers Market Appearances throughout new jersey
  • 2011 New York State Farm Aid 
  • 2012 Horizon Blue Cross and Blue Shield Healthcare Event
  • 2013 Paramus Farmers Market, Ramsey Farmers Market, Nutley Farmers Market
  • 2013 Horizon BlueCross , Moorestown NJ
  • 2013-2017 NBC Health Fair New York Giants Health And Fitness Exbo
  • 2014-2015  Dr Oz Show Appearance
  • 2014-2015 Northern New Jersey Farmers Markets
  • 2016 Business Expo"Taste of the Gold Coast' 
  • 2017 Sparta Farmers Market
  • 2016-2017 Meet and Greet Donaldsons Farm Hackettstown 
  • 2013-2017 Chester Harvest Celebration Meet and Greet
  • 2017 Westchester Food Bank An Evening Of Good Taste
  • Appeared at D'Agostino, King's Culinary Arts Cooking Schools, Macy's and Bloomingdale's Cooking Classes.
  • Because of obesity and fast foods in schools Pete has been asked to speak at numerous grammer and high schools about healthy eating and his love for produce.



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