Welcome to Produce Pete's

Our Products

Sit Down With Produce Pete

 

NBC's ' Produce Pete'  sits down to talk about food access issues, the New York Green Cart Initiative and his own beginnings as a street vendor.  He appears in the film THE APPLE PUSHERS (www.applepushers.com).

 

Produce Pete at Hunts Point Market, Bronx NY

 

Produce Pete NBC food contributor, talks produce with Hank Zona at the Hunts Point produce market

Pat & Pete at Eden Garden, South Orange

Pat and Produce Pete out for a fun day at Eden Garden Marketplace.  Pat's getting better at picking fresh fruits and vegetables then i am.

Produce Pete With Hank Zona At Katzman Produce

Produce Pete and Hank inside the refrigerator at Katzman Produce at the Hunts Point Market in the Bronx talking vegetables.

Produce Pete's WNBC Shows, Past and Present

image34

To see Produce Pete's shows please click the link below !!!

https://www.nbcnewyork.com/on-air/as-seen-on/Produce-Pete-151185725.html?page=1                              


!!!  Links to shows also available at bottom of page for shows listed !!!


JEOPARDY

image35

http://j-archive.com/showgame.php?game_id=1170




CLICK ON LINK ABOVE.  PRODUCE PETE A CATEGORY ON JEOPARDY??  WHO WOULD HAVE GUESSED!

PRODUCE PETE'S UPCOMING APPEARANCES

image36



08/01/19   HORIZON FOUNDATION SOUNDS OF THE CITY 2019 ( MUSIC OF PRINCE)  NJPAC  1 CENTER STREET, NEWARK NEW JERSEY    5 PM - 9 PM


08/15/19  GARDEN STATE AGRICULTURAL NIGHT AT TD BANK BALLPARK ( SOMERSET PATRIOTS) 

1 PATRIOTS PARK, BRIDGEWATER, N J  5 PM - 7 PM  COME ON OUT AND WATCH THE PATRIOTS

PLAY ON THERE FIELD OF DREAMS.


08/16/19  COOK'S MARKET AT RUTGERS GARDENS,  130 LOG CABIN ROAD, NEW BRUNSWICK, N J  08901   11 AM - 5 PM   TALKING NEW JERSEY TOMATOES


09/26/19    RUTGERS UNIVERSITY GARDEN PARTY,  112 RYDERS LANE, NEW BRUNSWICK, N J 

BOOK SIGNING AND FUNDRAISER







NEW JERSEY FARM BOUNTY 07/20/19

image37

Basil, Bunch Carrots, Bunch Beets and Garlic

 Growing up in New Jersey and selling fruits and vegetables off the back of my fathers truck all over the state, I have learned the importance of farming. My father always said without the farmer we were out of business.  There’s a reason it is called the “Garden State.” New Jersey’s diverse agriculture enables the state to hold its own with the largest fruit, vegetable and nursery-stock producing states in the nation. Each year New Jersey is a top-10 producer for such items as cranberries, blueberries, peaches, bell peppers, spinach and tomatoes. In fact, New Jersey is the most productive farmland in the United States based on highest dollar value per acre. Here is one of my favorite farms in northern new jersey that I do alot of film work in the field, showing all of you what it takes to get fresh fruits and vegetables to your table


Serving Northern New Jersey for over 100 years

The Kuehm Farm dates back to 1894 when the property was purchased by the first of five generations to own and operate the farm located in Wayne, NJ.  Farms View originated as a roadside stand with produce displayed on a picnic table on the side lawn. The business has since evolved to include a 40’ x 80’ Farm Market and attached greenhouse. During the peak summer growing season, over 65 varieties of non-GMO fruits and vegetables are picked daily for our Farm Market. Eight greenhouses are full of seedlings by the middle of March each year as we prepare to open our Garden Center for the spring season. 


Basil

Basil is an annual herb of the mint family, native to central and tropical Asia and Africa (some say it originated in India).

 HOW TO SELECT

Carefully select herbs that aren't wilted, dried-out, or bruised.

 HOW TO STORE

Snip off the bases of the stems and placing the bunch in a jar with an inch or two of water at the bottom. Store at room temperature in a light area, but out of direct 


Bunch Carrots

The carrot (Daucus carota) is a root vegetable often claimed to be the perfect health food.It is crunchy, tasty, and highly nutritious. Carrots are a particularly good source of beta carotene, fiber, vitamin K1, potassium, and antioxidants They also have a number of health benefits. They’re a weight-loss-friendly food and have been linked to lower cholesterol levels and improved eye health.What’s more, their carotene antioxidants have been linked to a reduced risk of cancer.Carrots are found in many colors, including yellow, white, orange, red, and purple.Orange carrots get their bright color from beta carotene, an antioxidant that your body converts into vitamin A.

 

HOW TO STORE CARROTS

If stored well, carrots can last forever. Alright like a month or two or three. The key is coolness (just above 32 degrees F) and dampness (95% humidity). Here’s how to store carrots in the refrigerator:


  1. Chop off the greens just above the root (tip: you can use carrot greens to make pesto).
  2. Punch a few holes in a plastic bag and place carrots in it.
  3. Slightly dampen a paper towel and set in the bottom of a produce drawer in the fridge. Store carrots on top of that.


And some general tips on how to store carrots best:

  • Do not wash until just before eating.
  • Don’t store carrots with fruits, as some fruits give off an ethylene gas that causes ripening and decay.
  • You can freeze carrots, but these are best for dishes where the carrots will be cooked, like soups and stews.

Red Bunch Beets

Beets don’t have the kind of history that inspires books or poetry. About the most interesting thing you can say about beets, which have apparently been cultivated since prehistoric times, is that early Romans only ate the tops, leaving the roots for medicinal purposes. However, once the Romans got around to cooking the bulbs (probably sometime after the birth of Christ), they found that they liked them very much indeed.  In the USA, beets are grown commercially in 31 states. California, New Jersey, Ohio and Texas are the main producers. Beets are also imported from Mexico and Canada. There are several varieties of mass-produced beets, but all are pretty much the same—round or with slightly flattened ends, a dusty red exterior, and deep red flesh inside.  Beet greens are often discarded in favor of the bulbs to which they are attached, which is unfortunate because they contain a wonderful, earthy flavor. When small, they can be put in a salad mix. If larger, they should be braised, stewed or boiled like other hearty greens.  For the most part, beets are available all year long. But the peak period, particularly for local and more exotic varieties, is June through October. It’s also the time of year when beet greens should be at their best.  Beets should be relatively smooth and firm. Small to medium size ones are best -- large ones may be tough. Leaves should be bright, dark green and fresh looking, without withering or slime.To store beets, separate the leaves from the root, leaving an inch or two of the stems attached to the root. Remove any leaves that are damaged before storing the tops in a plastic bag - preferably one that is perforated - in the crisper section of the refrigerator for no more than a few days. Don’t peel or clean the root since the skins will slip off easily during cooking. Put roots in a plastic bag and put them in the refrigerator, where they will keep at least a week. 


Garlic

Garlic is the most pungent member of the onion family. It is an essential ingredient in Italian cooking and as far as I’m concerned, no kitchen should be without it.The garlic plant grows to a height of about 12 inches, with a bulb made up of 8 to 12 sections or cloves, forming underground. The cloves are well protected by a papery white skin that may be streaked with red or purple. Garlic is believed to be a native of central Asia and is the oldest member of the alliums family. In the Dark Ages, people believed a garland of garlic would ward off evil sprits and the plague. Over the years it’s been prescribed for everything from athlete’s foot to baldness. In fact, the concentration of organic sulfur compounds in garlic is now recognized to have antibacterial properties, man people today swear it will stave off the common cold. Garlic is grown everywhere, but the largest U.S.supplier is California, with Mexico also supplying the market. Aromatic garlic is used to season meats, poultry, fish, vegetables, breads, marinades, sauces, and pasta – just about everything except desserts. 

Elephant garlic

 is big – bulbs can reach a pound apiece. It always fetches a high price in stores, but its flavor is rather mild. I prefer the potency of regular garlic – it’s richer and goes a long way.

 Season

Available year-round.

 Selecting

Choose garlic as you would onions; the bulbs should be fat and very firm with no spongy areas and no green sprouts. Sprouts indicate the bulb have been in storage too long.

 Storing

Stored in a cool, dry, well-ventilated place, garlic should keep for a month. Avoid refrigeration or plastic wrap, dampness quickly deteriorates the bulbs. 

Preparing

Raw garlic has a pungent flavor that adds depth and zip to salad dressings and marinades. It mellows as it’s cooked. Long, slow cooking makes garlic especially mellow and sweet. Leg of lamb is traditionally roasted with slivers of garlic pressed into the flesh. Try surrounding poultry or meats with whole cloves – peeled or unpeeled – before roasting, or toss the cloves with new potatoes, olive oil, and salt and roast in a covered pan. Roasted garlic cloves nearly liquefy inside, and the paste is delicious spread on toasted Italian bread. Simmer whole, peeled cloves gently in milk until tender; drain. Serve them alongside steaks or chops. Use garlic to make bean or fish dishes richer. My mother made aioli by simmering garlic in olive oil until tender, adding salt, herbs and often crushed hot peppers, and drizzle the mixture over pasta for a simple but satisfying dish.  


Click link below for show


 https://www.nbcnewyork.com/on-air/as-seen-on/Produce-Pete_-New-Jersey-Produce_New-York-512983532.html 

NORTHWEST CHERRIES 07/13/19

image38

 

You know it’s the beginning of summer when you start to see cherries in the market.

As with many fruits and vegetables, supply and demand dictates prices and, with such a short season filled with unpredictable weather conditions and so much of our crop sold abroad (where buyers pay high prices), cherries can be expensive a lot of the time.

Back in the 1950s, when we first opened our family store, Napolitano’s Produce in Bergenfield, I remember that we sold cherries by the bag and box at reasonable prices.

Now don’t get me wrong – you’ll still see cherries on sale in the marketplace, where they’ll often be priced as “loss leaders,” selling for cost or just above cost to bring people into the store.

I recall one time in the early 1960s, Pop got a sale on cherries and brought hundreds of 18-20-pound boxes of them into the store, where we stacked them up and sold them (today they’re sold to stores in 14-15 pound boxes and 9-10 pound boxes on imports in the winter).

It was a long time ago, but I think we charged $3.99 for an 18-20-pound box of cherries, which is hard to believe – you can’t necessarily even buy one pound of cherries for that now. But what’s cost as long as they’re good, right? That’s my way of thinking.

Big, red, crunchy, juicy, and loaded with antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds, cherries have been one of my favorite fruits for as long as I can remember.

The season is short so load up and get your fill now before they’re gone. Look for them on sale if you can, and remember what I always say – if you eat right, you’ll live right.


SHORT SEASON BIG FLAVOR


Cherries have one big flaw – they have a very short season, not much more than weeks in most places.

Although cherries originated in the Middle East and have been cultivated for centuries in Europe and Asia, the U.S. remains the biggest producer, consumer and exporter of cherries.

Most sweet cherries are grown on the west coast, where Washington State is the biggest producer. Except for local crops, which aren’t shipped at all, the cherries you’ll typically see on the market have been shipped from California, Oregon and Washington state, with Idaho and British Columbia contributing to the supply.

The two most common cherry varieties are Lamberts and Bings.

Lamberts ripen earlier and are smaller and more tender than Bings. They range in color from deep pink to red, with a soft, somewhat watery flesh and a deep red or blackish-red juice.

They arrive from California in early June, with later harvests coming from Oregon, Washington, and Idaho.

Bings are big, dark, heart-shaped cherries with great flavor. They’re very firm, with a deep red to black skin, a white heart, and a bit of crunch when you bite into them. They last longer and ship better than Lamberts.

Royal Annes, also called Rainers and sometimes Napoleons, are also occasionally seen on the market.

This large, heart-shaped fruit is amber to yellow in color, with a red blush. It’s an excellent cherry with an intense flavor, juicy flesh, and a white heart. These cherries are more fragile, easily bruised, and have a shorter shelf life than Bings; many people shy away from them because of their color, but one taste and they’re hooked.


OPEN SEASON


California cherries arrive in early June and are generally out of season by mid-June, with more northern crops gradually replacing them during the summer months, ending with cherries from British Columbia in early August.

That’s a total of seven or eight weeks, so if you like cherries and see some good-looking ones at the fruit stand, buy them, because the next time you look they may be gone.

Sweet cherries are also grown in the midwest and in northeastern states, but I don’t think their fruit compares to the size or flavor of western cherries.

The sweet cherries that show up in January are from Chile, and they continue to improve in flavor and texture.


SELECTION, STORAGE AND PREPARATION


Cherries won’t ripen or improve in flavor after they’re picked, so what you see is what you get.

They must be picked ripe and then they’ll last only a couple of days, so harvesting time is critical.

A ripe cherry is heavier in the hand, meatier, sweeter and juicier than an immature cherry. Cherries that are picked too soon are pale and tasteless, while those picked too ripe are soft and watery. The best time to pick them seems to be right before the birds start eating them – birds have an uncanny instinct for ripe cherries.

When selecting cherries, choose firm, large, bright-colored fruit.

Royal Annes should be bright and unblemished, while Bings should be as firm and dark as possible; pale red Bings are immature and won’t be especially sweet.

Also look at the stems – if the cherries have green stems, they’re fresh, and if the stem is missing, pass on these cherries because they’ve been off the tree too long.

They should also look clean and dry – never buy cherries that are soft, flabby, or sticky on the outside.

When cherries go bad, they start to lose their vibrant hue, develop a brownish color, and leak. Once a cherry starts leaking, the fermentation process will quickly make the whole box go bad.

I love eating cherries on their own, cut up into fruit or green salads, or blended into a variety of baked goods like muffins or cherry pie.


PRODUCE PETE'S FUN CHERRY FACTS


Turkey is the largest supplier of cherries in the world

Cherries came to the United States in the 1600's from Europe, first to Oregon and then to the Northwest.

The Bing cherry got it's name, not from Bing Crosby, but from a cherry orchard forman by the name of bing who was over 7 feet tall.

There are over 1000 varieties of cherries but only 10 are grown commercially. 

The biggest producer of cherries is Washington State ( 62%) with Oregon and California making up about 94% in total.

The average Cherry Tree produces about 7000 cherries per tree.

25 million 20 lb boxes will be packed and shipped in 2019.

Cherries have been around since the Stone Age, that's even older then me.


ON THE ROAD AGAIN WITH PRODUCE PETE


This weeks segment was filmed at Farms View Farm in Wayne New Jersey, I love to stop by farms and markets and look, it drives Bette crazy, she would rather be shopping at one of the malls .Enjoy your fill of what summer gives to us and enjoy these Bing Cherries, its a short season. 

Click on link below for Cherry Show

s://www.nbcnewyork.com/on-air/as-seen-on/Produce-Pete_-Northwest-Cherries_New-York-512698852.html


NEW JERSEY FARM CORN 07/06/19

image39

  Farms View Farm and Roadstand in Wayne , New Jersey is one of the last working farms in Northwest New Jersey. The Kuehm family dates back to 1894 when the property was purchased by the first of five generations that operate the farm in Wayne New Jersey. Farms View Roadstand has evolved from a picnic table on a side lawn many years ago to this farm stand with attached greenhouses. I love doing segments at family farms to show all of you where fresh fruits and vegetables get their start. Long days and hard work are what farming is all about. Today we are talking fresh corn right from the farm, picked 5 am this morning at Farms View Farm.


Please support your local Jersey Farmers, Fresh From the Farm Daily.  


NEW JERSEY CORN


Americans seem to be the only people who understand the virtues of sweet corn on the cob. A native American grain related to wheat, barley, and rye, corn didn't reach Europe until the sixteenth century. It's still far more popular here than among Europeans, who continue to call corn by its proper name--maize. Sweet corn is harvested young for use as a vegetable. Field corn is the variety that's dried and ground for meal, pressed for corn oil, or used as feed for livestock. The best sweet corn is an ear that's brought from the field straight to the pot. Years ago farmers would deliver corn to our market at three o'clock in the morning. My father would wake us, and we'd have to go down to the store to unload the corn--dozens of bags with fifty ears in each bag. There was a little stove at the back of the store, and my mother would put water on to boil, husk a bunch of ears, and cook corn for us right on the spot, which made this awful middle-of-the-night chore bearable. It was so fresh coming off the truck that to this day I don't think I've ever had corn as good. Once corn is picked, its natural sugars start turning to starch. The process is slowed by refrigeration, but by the time corn is harvested and shipped form California or Florida to the rest of the country, as much as a week may have passed. The corn will be pretty good, but not as good as corn picked locally. People with vegetable gardens literally start boiling the water before the corn is picked so they can put it in the pot as fast as they can shuck it. 

Varieties

You can get white, yellow, or bicolor corn, and though lots of people have preferences, the color has little to do with the sweetness. The only thing that determines taste is how long it's been off the stalk. There are, however, two relatively new hybrids designed to make corn hold its sugar longer: sugar-enhanced varieties and the newer "supersweets." Sugar-enhanced varieties have good corn flavor and are excellent when corn is out of season and has to be shipped to market. The supersweets are very- very sweet in fact, many corn lovers think they have an artificial taste. For my money, old-fashioned sweet corn straight out of the field is still tops. 

Season

The best time to eat corn on the cob is middle to late summer. Corn is grown almost everywhere, and the best place to get it is at farm stands or produce markets where corn is delivered every day. We use to send someone up to Smith's Farm every morning at 6 A.M. to pick up corn from Wally, who had been supplying Napolitano's for more than forty years.

Selecting

Look for a husk that's firm, fresh, and green-looking. Don't strip it; just look at the tassel or silk. On really fresh corn, the tassel will be pale and silky, with only a little brown at the top, where it's been discolored by the sun. Also try holding the ear in your hand: if it's warm, it's starting to turn to starch; if it's still cool, it's probably fresh. Although producers have fewer problems with worms now, don't worry if you spot a worm or two. The worms know what they're doing--they go after the sweetest ears. And since they usually eat right around the top, you can just break that part off.  STORINGThe short answer is don't; just eat fresh corn right away. But if you must, store it in the refrigerator. 

Preparing

A lady came into my store years ago and said, "I cook corn so long it almost starts to pop, and it's still tough." I said, "That's because you're cooking it so long!" Never overcook fresh, sweet corn. It only needs a few minutes' cooking time. To boil it, bring the water to a boil before dropping in the shucked ears. If the ears are too long for the pot, don't cut them with a knife, which tends to crush the kernels; just break them in two with you hands. Let the water return to a boil, and boil hard for three to four minutes. Remove immediately and serve: don't let the corn stand in the water.  To microwave corn, shuck it, spread with butter if you wish, cover closely with plastic wrap or waxed paper, and microwave on full power (100 percent) about 2 1/2 minutes per ear.  Corn is also great cooked on the grill. To prepare, pull down the husks but don't detach them and remove the silks. Spread some butter and salt on the kernels, then pull the husks back up and twist closed. Grill the ears for about fifteen minutes, turning them often.  If you've got corn that's two or three days old, you can add it to soups or use it to make creamed corn, fritters, or spoon bread. Add it to seafood chowder or other soups, or make corn relish with it--there are plenty of ways to prepare it.


CORN MAKES BUTTER TASTE BETTER


 PRODUCE PETE SWEET CORN FUN FACTS

 

 Corn was first grown by Native Americans more than 7,000 years ago in Central America

.Sweet corn leaves were used as chewing gum by Native Americans

.Corn is grown on every continent except Antarctica.

Corn plants typically grow 7 – 10 feet tall. Sweet corn plants are several feet shorter.

The tassel borne at the top of the stalk is the male part and the silk of the ear is the female part

.The tassel releases millions of grains of pollen, and some of them are caught by the silk.

There is one strand of silk for each kernel on a cob

.On average there are about 800 kernels on an ear of corn

.An ear of corn always has even number rows

.One acre of land can produce 14,000 pounds of sweet corn.

Depending upon the cultivar type, the crop may be ready for harvesting in 65-90 days

.Corn is cholesterol free.It’s a good source of vitamin C and A, potassium, thiamine and fiber, and very high in antioxidants

 .Corn is a 100% whole grain

.Corn is high in natural sugars/starches.One average ear of yellow sweet corn equals 86 calories.

Sweet corn is a tasty and nutritious addition to any meal.


Click on the link below for New Jersey Corn Show 

 https://www.nbcnewyork.com/on-air/as-seen-on/Produce-Pete_-New-Jersey-Corn_New-York-512297062.html 

NEW JERSEY BLUEBERRIES 06/29/19

image40

NEW JERSEY BLUEBERRIES

 The blueberry is a Native American species with deep roots in America's history. By the time the Pilgrims arrived, the American Indians were already enjoying these juicy berries year round through very clever preservation techniques. They were dried in the sun, then added whole to soups, stews and meat; or crushed into a powder and rubbed into meat - perhaps the predecessor of today's trendy "spice rubs". The powder would also be combined with cornmeal, water and honey to make a pudding called Sautauthig. The Pilgrims learned to appreciate blueberries from the Indians, especially as it was the Indian's gift of blueberries which helped the new settlers make it through that first cold winter. Blueberries also have a place in the annals of folk medicine. Their roots were brewed into a tea to help relax women during childbirth; their leaves steeped to make a blood purifier. Blueberry juice and syrup also cured coughs, according to tribal medicine men. The blueberry is no youngster, botanist’s estimate it's been around for more than 13,000 years. However, it wasn't cultivated until the first quarter of this century. Elizabeth White and Dr. Frederick V. Coville were the first to develop the hybrid for cultivated highbush blueberries by domesticating and improving wild highbush blueberry species. The result is a plump, juicy, sweet and easy-to-pick berry with color ranging from deep purple-blue to blue-black, highlighted by a silvery sheen called the "bloom". Botanically speaking, the blueberry is part of a family that includes the flowering azalea, mountain laurel and heather - all plants that favor acid soil, plenty of water and a cool season. Once growers learned how to increase soil acidity, they were able to grow cultivated blueberries in 35 states and two provinces. Among the major cultivated blueberry producing regions are New Jersey in the East, Michigan and Indiana in the Mid West, and Oregon, Washington and British Columbia in the West. Blueberries are harvested in the South as well, with berries coming from North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas and Texas. On average, cultivated blues represent more than half of all the blueberries produced in North America. Lowbush blues are also harvested, but mainly for use in processed foods. Cultivated blueberries grow in clusters and don't all ripen at once. The berries at the bottom of the cluster can be ripe while the ones on top are still green. Fresh blueberries are picked by hand to gather the best quality fruit. Harvesting machines are also used to harvest blueberries, gently shaking each plant so only the ripe berries fall into the catching frame. Most of the machine harvested berries are immediately frozen for use year round. Although fresh blueberries are available nearly eight months of the year from producers across the US and Canada, the peak season is from mid-June to mid-August when the majority of all North American blues are harvested. The earliest harvest is in the southern states and it progressively moves north and into Canada as the season continues. And after the fresh season is over, cultivated blueberries can still be enjoyed year round, as frozen berries, and in processed foods. Slightly less than half of all cultivated blueberries are shipped to the fresh market, while the balance of the berries are harvested to be frozen, pureed, concentrated, canned or dried to be used in a wide range of food products, including yogurt, pastries, muffins, baby food, ice cream and cereals. 


Buying Fresh Blueberries

Look for: fresh blueberries that are firm, dry, plump, smooth-skinned and relatively free from leaves and stems. Size is not an indicator of maturity but color is - berries should be deep purple-blue to blue-black; reddish berries aren't ripe, but may be used in cooking. Stay away from: containers of berries with juice stains, which may be a sign that the berries are crushed and possibly moldy; soft, watery fruit that means the berries are overripe; dehydrated, wrinkled fruit that means the berries have been stored too long. Fresh berries should be stored covered, in the refrigerator and washed just before using. Use within 10 days of purchase. 


Frozen Blueberries

Dry-pack berries in poly bags or boxes can be found in the frozen food section of your supermarket. The frozen berries should feel loose, not clumped together. Frozen blueberries are individually quick frozen so you can pull out a few or as many as needed. Blueberries should be kept frozen and the unused portion returned to the freezer promptly. If not used immediately, cover and refrigerate thawed berries and use within three days. Commercially frozen berries are washed before being frozen so washing again is not necessary. If you make your own frozen blueberries, wash just before using. 


How to Freeze Your Own Blueberries

The secret to successful freezing is to use berries that are unwashed and completely dry before popping them into the freezer. Completely cover the blueberry containers with plastic wrap or a resealable plastic bag, or transfer berries to a plastic bag and seal airtight. Or, arrange dry berries in a single layer on a cookie sheet. When frozen, transfer berries to plastic bags or freezer containers. 


Nutrition

Luscious, sweet blueberries have a nutrition profile fitting for our modern day. They are not only low fat, but also a good source of both fiber and vitamin C. In fact, a one-cup serving of fresh blueberries will give you 5 grams of fiber, more than most fruits and vegetables and 15% of your daily value for vitamin C at a cost of only 80 calories. When buying packaged goods that call themselves "blueberry", such as waffles and pancakes; cereals and cookies; muffin, cake and cookie baking mixes, be sure to read the ingredient label closely. Some products don't contain any real blueberries at all, but rather artificially flavored and colored bits or apple pieces, designed to simulate berries. Blueberries may change color when cooked. Acids, such as lemon juice and vinegar, cause the blue pigment in the berries to turn reddish. Blueberries also contain a yellow pigment, which in an alkaline environment, such as a batter with too much baking soda, may give you greenish-blue berries. To reduce the amount of color streaking, stir your blueberries in last (right from your freezer, if frozen) into your cake or muffin batter. For pancakes and waffles, add the blueberries as soon as the batter has been poured on the griddle or waffle iron. This will make the pancakes prettier and they'll be easier to flip. If frozen blueberries are used, cooking time may have to be increased to be sure the berries are heated through.


  MORE FROM PRODUCE PETE 


Blueberries are an amiable berry-getting along well with a diverse crowd of foods and flavors.      Though they can't be beat in all things sweet - such as cakes, puddings, muffins,pancakes, cookies, etc., don't forget, they're pretty impressive  on the savory side, too. Their fresh, fruity flavor teams up perfectly with pork, chicken and game, and they're dynamite in fruit salsas and sauces  accented with black or red pepper, thyme and mint. 


  • Spices love blueberries; try them with cardamom, cinnamon, coriander, ginger and candled ginger, mace, nutmeg and vanilla beans or vanilla extract; also fresh herbs like cilantro, mint and basil. 
  • Dairy foods are a natural mate for blueberries - cottage cheese, ice cream, frozen yogurt, sherbet, sour cream, heavy cream, ricotta cheese, or try blueberries as part of a fruit and cheese platter with mild cheeses such as Brie and goat cheese. 
  • Almost any fruit teams up well with blueberries - apples, apricots, coconut, melons, citrus fruits and all other berries. 
  • All kinds of nuts go well,especially almonds - almond paste. 
  • Liqueurs, such as orange or raspberry are good companions; also rum or rum extract. 
  • Try dried blueberries instead of raisins in your next granola mix, oatmeal cookies, gingerbread, cornbread or pound cake.

Click link below for New Jersey Blueberry Show 


 https://www.nbcnewyork.com/on-air/as-seen-on/Produce-Pete_-New-Jersey-Blueberries_New-York-512002252.html 


GOLDEN PINEAPPLES 06/22/19

image41

GOLDEN PINEAPPLES


 Once known as the fruit of kings, for many years, pineapples were available only to natives of the tropics and to wealthy Europeans. Despite the fact that the pineapples were available only to natives of the tropics and to wealthy Europeans. Despite the fact that the pineapple has become a familiar item in U.S. markets, it's still a true exotic. For one thing, it is a member of the bromeliad family, in which edible fruits are rare. A pineapple starts out as a stalk of a hundred or more flowers that shoots up from a plant about three feet tall. Each flower develops a fruit that forms one of the scales on the outside of the pineapple. The more scales or marks on a pineapple, the stronger the tropical taste will be. A pineapple with fewer and larger scales will have a milder but sweeter flavor and more juice.It was probably the Guarani Indians who took pineapples on sea voyages as provisions and to prevent scurvy, thus spreading the plants from their native Paraguay throughout South and Central  America. Columbus called the fruit piña when he found it in 1493--piña because he thought it looked like a pinecone--and from that we got the name. The hybrid we know today first appeared around 1700, when the Dutch improved the fruit by crossbreeding. They sold cuttings of the plant to the English, who raised them as hothouse plants. It wasn't until the nineteenth century that canned pineapple began to come out of Hawaii. If you wanted a fresh Hawaiian pineapple, you had to go there to get one. Picked ripe, as the Hawaiian variety has to be, a fresh pineapple simply could not survive the long journey by ship. It was only when air transport became available that fresh Hawaiian pineapple began to arrive in mainland markets. 


Varieties 

There are two main varieties of pineapples: Red Spanish and Cayenne. The Red Spanish is the most commonly available. It is a deep orange color, with white to yellow meat and a crown of hard, spiky leaves on top. A recently developed "thornless" variety has a softer, smoother leaf crown that makes the pineapple easier to handle. Red Spanish pineapples are grown in Honduras, Costa Rica, Puerto  Rico, Mexico, and elsewhere in Central America. The Cayenne pineapple is the Hawaiian variety. The scales on a ripe Cayenne tend to be a lighter yellow, the leaves have a smoother edge, and the pineapple itself is much larger and more elongated than the Red Spanish. The flesh is deep yellow. There are three other less- common varieties. One, called Sugarloaf, is a heavy, round variety with a pointed top that's cultivated in Mexico and Venezuela. Sugarloaf is another big pineapple that can reach ten pounds. Finally, the sweetest pineapples I have ever eaten come from Africa's Ivory Coast. They show up here only rarely--I've had them only two or three times in all the years I've been in the business. If you ever come across them--most likely n June, July, or August--Buy some. Of the pineapples readily available here, to my taste the Cayenne is by far the best, although it can be two or three times as expensive as the Red Spanish. It is sweeter and juicier than the Red Spanish, which is picked greener because it's shipped by boat instead of by air. If you're in the islands where they're grown, by all means buy and eat Red Spanish pineapples--they'll have been picked ripe and they'll be excellent. If you see a Red Spanish in the States that looks and smells good, it's going to be pretty good too. For consistent quality and sweetness, however, Cayennes are your best bet. The tag "Jet Fresh" tells you the pineapple is a Hawaiian Cayenne picked ripe and flown in. The Dole and Del Monte labels also indicate a Cayenne pineapple, although they may not be Hawaiian. Cayennes are now being cultivated in Honduras and Costa Rica by both companies. They're a little more expensive than the Red Spanish but cheaper than those from Hawaii. 


HONEYGLOW PINEAPPLES  ( NEW VARIETY)

 

Honeyglow Pineapple is a new pineapple variety that the Del Monte company, a leader in the production and marketing of pineapples in the world, has just added to its catalog.

This new pineapple will be marketed in calibers 5-6, with a coloration level that ranges between 3 and 4, and a minimum of 12 degrees brix. Its production will be limited, but it will be available 52 weeks a year and it will be sent by sea.

 Consumers today demand healthy and tasty products that are easy to consume and that are produced in a sustainable manner that is friendly to the environment. Del Monte Fresh's new reference, the Honeyglow ™ Pineapple, meets all these requirements while maintaining its competitiveness in cost by being shipped by sea," stated Gianpaolo Renino, Del Monte's vice president for Europe and Africa.

"Since Del Monte's pineapples are cultivated in the Pacific and the Atlantic areas of Costa Rica, they can be available at the points of sale 52 weeks a year, maintaining a maximum consistency in their aroma, texture, sweetness and color characteristics.


Season

For Hawaiian pineapples, the peak season generally comes in April and May, but they're available year round. Caribbean pineapples have two seasons: December through February and August through September. 


Selecting

Many people think that if you can easily pull a leaf out of the crown, the pineapple is ripe, but this test doesn't tell you anything useful. Like tomatoes, pineapples are considered mature when they develop a little color break. If a pineapple at the market looks green, take a look at the base. If it has begun to turn a little orange or red there, you'll be able to ripen it at home. If there is no break, the pineapple was picked too green. It will have a woody texture and will never be very sweet. The pineapple should be very firm, never soft or spongy, with no bruises or soft spots. If you find a good-looking pineapple at your market and you're going to use it right away, ask your produce manager to cut it in half to make sure it's not discolored inside. Reject it if it is. Finally, use your nose. If the pineapple has a good aroma, it's ripe. If you can't smell much of anything, it needs to be ripened. If it has a fermented smell, don't buy it! 


Ripening and Storing

To ripen a pineapple, stand it upside down on the counter. That's right, stand it on the leaf end. This makes the sugar flow toward the top and keeps the pineapple from fermenting at the bottom. Let it ripen for a few days. When it develops a golden color and smells good, it's ripe. Peeled pineapple should be wrapped in plastic and refrigerated. If it's not wrapped well, a pineapple will absorb other food odors in you refrigerator. A lot of supermarkets have a machine that will cut and core your pineapple for you, but it wastes up to 35 percent of the fruit. Pineapples are not that difficult to cut. Just twist off the leaves, lay the pineapple on its side, and slice it like a loaf of bread. Then peel and core each slice. I just cut off the peel and eat the slices with my fingers--around the core, like an apple. That's my favorite recipe for ripe pineapple! If you want to serve the pineapple chilled, I suggest that you chill it whole, then slice and peel after it is cold.


A LITTLE MORE FUN INFORMATION ON PINEAPPLES It takes almost 3 years for a single pineapple to reach maturation. Which makes the price tag a bit more understandable.    Pineapple plants have really pretty flowers.  The pineapple plant’s flowers — which can vary from lavender to bright red — produce berries that actually coalesce together around the fruit’s core. So the pineapple fruit itself is actually a bunch of “fruitlets” fused together.    Once harvested, pineapples don’t continue to ripen.  That means that every single pineapple in the grocery store is as ripe as it will ever be so don’t buy one and save it for a week, thinking it will ripen. The difference in colors is mostly based on where the pineapples were grown so a green pineapple can be just as sweet and delicious as a golden brown one.  Although the fruit originated in South America, the majority of the world’s pineapples now come from Southeast Asia. Namely the Philippines and Thailand. For the freshest pineapples in the U.S., look for Costa Rica- or Hawaii-grown pineapples.   Pineapple Nutrition 

Pineapples contain bromelain, an enzyme that may help arthrhis pain by easing inflammation. They are also a good source of vitamin c, which helps your immune system. 

Click link below for Golden Pineapple Show
https://www.nbcnewyork.com/on-air/as-seen-on/Produce-Pete_-Pineapple_New-York-511671082.html
 

CALIFORNIA CANTALOUPES 06/15/19

image42

 CALIFORNIA CANTALOUPES


Great fragrance is the hallmark of a good ripe cantaloupe. In my younger days, when I had the store and I would come home from the market the smell from a crate or two of cantaloupes in the truck would fill the air, it didn't matter what other produce was in there. When I opened  the door to unload, the warm, rich, sweet summer smell of melons is the first thing that hits me. Usually the least expensive and probably the most popular melons on the market, cantaloupes are sweet, fragrant, and juicy, with a pinkish orange to bright orange flesh. Grown primarily in California and other western states, cantaloupes are round, with a golden, tightly netted skin. Although good cantaloupes from the West are available from June through December, they are best between June and September. That's when the California crop is at its peak, and I think that state grows the best cantaloupes. Arizona is next, New Mexico and Texas also grow big cantaloupe crops.


ORIGAMI CANTALOUPE VARIETY


 Origami cantaloupes have the signature rough, tannish, netted skin of other cantaloupe varieties and range in size from 8 to 12 centimeters in diameter. Unlike other cantaloupes the Origami cantaloupe is prized for its thin rind and smaller seed cavity thus giving it more edible flesh. The orange flesh is succulent, juicy and sweet. When ripe the Origami cantaloupe has one of the strongest floral musky aromas of any cantaloupe. For best flavor pick cantaloupes that have a full slip, raised netting and a sweet aroma.
 


  OTHER VARIETIES


Almost all cantaloupes commercially grown in California are of the Hale's Best group of varieties. Several strains are on the market, each with a few distinct characteristics. Other varieties include Hymark and Mission. California provides the bulk of supplies to the U.S. with Arizona and Texas also producing considerable amounts. U.S. availability begins in late April and the peak months are June through September. If the stem end is rough with portions of the stem remaining, the melon was harvested prematurely. Shriveled, flabby or badly bruised product signals poor quality. Also avoid melons with growth cracks, mottling or decay (mold or soft sunken spots on the surface). A mature cantaloupe will be well netted or webbed with a smoothly rounded, depressed scar at the stem end. When ready to eat, cantaloupe will take on a yellow background appearance, acquire an aroma and soften. Because cantaloupe is shipped in a firm state to avoid damage, it usually needs a few days at room temperature to soften and become juicier. To prevent bacteria on the melon netting from passing through to the flesh when cutting, follow these FDA rules: 


  • Wash melons with potable water. 
  • Clean and sanitize the cutting area and utensils. 
  • Hold cut product at 45F, 7.2C, or lower. 

SEASON


The best time to buy western cantaloupes is between June and September, when the California melons are at their peak. During December, January, and February, we get cantaloupes imported from Central America. Although you'll occasionally get lucky and find a good one, most of these are both overpriced and lousy. In February, March, April and May we start to see Mexican cantaloupes. They aren't as good as summer cantaloupes from the States, but over the last few years the quality has improved and the price has become more reasonable. 


 SELECTING


Color and, more important, fragrance - not softness at the stem end - indicates ripeness. A cantaloupe with golden color and ripe, sweet aroma is going to be a ripe, sweet melon. Don't push the stem end - if your neighbor presses a thumb there, and I press mine there, you're going to feel something soft even if the melon is grass green. For some reason, cantaloupes with tighter netting seem to have a firmer, crisper texture and cut better than those with the looser, more open netting. A cantaloupe on the green side will ripen if you leave it out at room temperature until any green undertones in the rind have turned golden and the melon has a rich smell. But in season, during the summer, there's no excuse for taking home a green melon. In-season melons should have been picked fully mature and fully ripe, with little or no green showing. I think melons taste better and have a better texture at room temperature, but if you like your melon chilled, refrigerate it right before you're going to eat it. Cut melons, of course, have to be refrigerated, but wrap them tightly in plastic to preserve moisture. If you don't want everything in your refrigerator to smell and taste like cantaloupes (and vice-versa), it's a good idea to put the melon in a heavy plastic or glass container with a tight-fitting lid. Cantaloupes are fine eaten as is for breakfast or dessert or cut up with other melons and fruits in a salad. Nutrient content descriptors for cantaloupes include: fat-free, saturated fat-free, very-low-sodium, cholesterol-free, high in vitamin A, high in vitamin C and a good source of folate (add 10% folate to label). Because cantaloupe is easy to cut, it can be used as an appetizer, in salads, as a breakfast plate garnish and in compotes and desserts.


  A FEW FUN FACTS FROM PRODUCE PETE 


Did you know…

– Cantaloupes are considered a luxury and are commonly given as a gift in Japan.– Cantaloupes were first brought to America by Christopher Columbus is 1492.– Did you know that “down under” in Australia they refer to cantaloupe as “ROCKMELON”? Makes sense to us – they kind of do look like rocks.– An average sized cantaloupe contains just 100 calories. Who knew something so sweet could be good for you?– Cantaloupes are the most popular melon in the United States.  Try them freeze dried for an all natural, portable, healthy snack.– They are members of vine-crop family, including other melons, squash, cucumbers, pumpkins, and gourds. They have plenty of relatives – one big happy family.– Not only do they taste good, they also fight against lung and oral cavity cancers.– Because cantaloupes are high in Vitamin A, they help maintain good eye health. Vitamin A is essential for maintaining healthy mucus membrane and skin of your eye.– Cantaloupes protect you from UV rays. Forget the sunblock! Just joking, you should still definitely wear sunblock on top of adding more cantaloupe into your diet.– Cantaloupes also help fight infections due to being filled with Vitamin C.– Cantaloupes trailing vine can reach up to 5 feet in height.– Fruits develop after 90 days of planting. Don’t plant them if you’re craving one right away – you’re better off going to the grocery store.– Cantaloupes have many roles. They can be consumed fresh and as an ingredient in a fruit salad or used to create sorbets, smoothies and ice-creams. Even freeze dried, cantaloupes are a healthy snack.– The cantaloupe was first cultivated in the 1700s, in the Italian papal village of Cantalup. Now we know where they got the name from.These are just a few of our favorites! We hope you share these interesting cantaloupe fun facts with your family and friends, and try to incorporate cantaloupe in your diet if you haven’t already. They are super nutritious and packed with vitamins.

 
NUTRITION FACTS

Serving Size: 1/4 Med. Cantaloupe   (134g)    Amount Per Serving Calories: 50     Calories from Fat 0                             % of Daily Value Total Fat: 0g         0% Saturated Fat: 0g     0% Cholesterol: 0mg     0 % Sodium: 25mg          1 % Total Carbohydrate: 12g    4 % Dietary Fiber  1 g         4 % Sugars: 11g Protein: 1g    Vitamin A: 100%         Vitamin C  80% Calcium: 2%             Iron 2 %  *Percent Daily Values are based on   a 2,000-calorie diet.    Source: PMA's Labeling Facts 


Click link below for Cantaloupe Show


 https://www.nbcnewyork.com/on-air/as-seen-on/Produce-Pete_-Cantaloupes_New-York-511344761.html 

SEEDLESS WATERMELON SHOW 06/08/19

image43

SEEDLESS WATERMELON

  Watermelon to me brings back memories of my childhood which, of course, was a very long time ago. Years ago we used to peddle door to door - the time when the supermarkets came to you. Now in those days we used to have what we called straight loads, which most of the time were watermelons. Watermelons sold then mostly whole, never cut, except if you plugged it. Plugging is when you make a triangle cut into the watermelon, then you pull out the triangle cut to see if the watermelon is ripe. Red, juicy, with a thin rind is what you're looking for. Back then, everybody bought whole melons because they had big families. As the seedless variety began to get more popular, the cutting of watermelon also became the thing to do. Now watermelons are mostly sold by the piece. Summertime or year-round - there is nothing better than a good ripe watermelon. It didn't happen overnight or over the span of a few growing seasons. It took years and years to get rid of those seeds. Yet the result is somewhat truly amazing to behold, and even more amazing to taste. The seedless watermelon is sweeter and crunchier, with a nice thin rind. You ought to see all the ways people try to test whether watermelon is ripe. They thump them. They twist the stem to see if it will twist back. I've seen people balance straw on a melon to see if the straw will rotate. People have even brought buckets of water into the store to see if a melon will float. Everybody has some magical way to see if a watermelon is ripe, but there's one simple, sure way to tell. Look at the stem end: if the stem is shrunken and shriveled, the melon is ripe.

 

Varieties

African in origin, watermelons are actually edible gourds in the same family as cucumbers and squash. The top three producers in the United States are Florida, Texas, and California, with Florida providing up to 90 percent of those we get on the East Coast. There are many varieties, many different shapes and sizes - a few with yellow flesh, most of them with red. Some people avoid watermelons because they're so big but a lot of small varieties have been developed that are terrific, and most markets sell large melons cut into halves or quarters. The average weight of a watermelon is five to thirty pounds, with some varieties as small as two pounds. 


Season

Seventy-five percent of the crop is produced in June, July, and August, but watermelons are available year round - imported from Mexico and Central America in the hard winter months, although in December and January they're very expensive and in limited supply. As with most fruits, you should buy watermelons when the domestic crop is in season. 


Selecting

Although a seedless watermelon will ripen after it's picked, if you want it ripe when you buy it, look for a stem that's shrunken and discolored. If the stem is missing, the watermelon is too ripe; it will be mealy and dark and not taste fresh. If the stem is green - the watermelon is too green and not ripe. The skin should be dull, not shiny. Slap the melon and listen for a hollow thump. A yellow belly or the underside of the watermelon usually indicates the fruit is ripe. Cut melons are usually more expensive per pound than those bought whole, but they may be a better buy because you see exactly what you're getting. The blossom end of the watermelon is usually the ripest and therefore the sweetest part. If you're buying a cut melon, look for the blossom end. Make sure the flesh is dark red and firm.

 

Storing

Store a whole seedless watermelon in a cool place, not in direct sunlight. Don't refrigerate it unless it's cut or you want to chill it a few hours before serving. 


Preparing

Slice and serve or combine chunks or balls with other fruits for fruit salad; serve in the watermelon shell. Puree seedless watermelon for a delicious drink or freeze the puree to make ice pops or sorbet.  Enjoy! 


Did you know?

Soon to be published research by the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows that watermelon is as much as 60% higher in lycopenes than tomatoes. Lycopene is a pigment that gives the bright red color to tomatoes, watermelon, grapefruit and guava. Recent studies show the intake of lycopene is associated with reductions in several forms of cancer, including prostate, breast, lung and cancer of the uterus. The anti-cancer properties of lycopene appear to be due to its effectiveness as an antioxidant. Warm days and cool nights in the watermelon growing areas help increase lycopene content. The riper or redder the melon…..the more lycopene. In addition to lycopene, watermelons also contain other properties beneficial to the body, including citrulline, an amino acid compound, which helps flush out the kidneys.

 

Interesting and Fun Watermelon Facts

Top 10 Watermelon Fun Facts

  1. Watermelon is grown in more then 96 countries worldwide .
  2. Over 1,200 varieties are grown around the world.   
  3. Every part of the melon is edible, including the seeds and rind .
  4. Early explorers used  watermelons as canteens.   
  5. The first recorded watermelon harvest occurred in Egypt nearly 5,000 years ago.     
  6. The word “watermelon” first  appeared in the English dictionary in 1615.  
  7. In some cultures, it is popular to bake watermelon seeds and eat them.  
  8. In recent years, more than 4 billion pounds of watermelon have been produced annually worldwide.    
  9. The first cookbook published in the United States was released in 1796 and it contained a recipe for watermelon rind pickles.     
  10. Food historian John Martin Taylor said that early Greek settlers brought the method of pickling watermelons with them to Charleston South Carolina


NAPOLITANO'S PRODUCE


The story of how Napolitano's Produce in Bergenfield NJ got it's start, has to do with watermelons. My father was always in the produce business but really didn't care much for it, you know it was never his choice , it was what the family did. Now from time to time he would do other jobs, a butcher, truck driver, bar owner, and a bus driver. well it just so happened that he was driving a bus for Red and Tan Line in northern New Jersey, when my Mom came to him and said, Pete, I was getting gas at a service station in Bergenfield and I noticed that next to him was an empty lot and I thought , that would make a perfect spot for me to sell some watermelons off one of your trucks. Mom was always thinking of how to bring extra money in the household, those  days were pretty lean, and she was a woman ahead of her times. So being a good husband he bought her a load of watermelons, parked her on the corner by the gas station and went about driving the bus. To his surprise, but not her's, she sold the whole load that day. Now being such a good husband, he bought her two loads the next day, she sold all of them and he stopped driving the bus, and Napolitano's Produce was born.

So when people always say to me, your father had a great business, I always thank them with a little smile, if it wasn't for mom , who knows what would have been.


ENJOY YOUR SUMMER !!

 


 Click link below for PRODUCE PETE STEVE CARELL WATERMELON SHOW


 http://www.cc.com/video-clips/dxgyh6/the-daily-show-with-jon-stewart-produce-pete-with-steve-carell---watermelon 



Click the link for watermelon show


 https://www.nbcnewyork.com/on-air/as-seen-on/511015791.html
 


SOUTHERN PEACHES 06/01/19

image44

GEORGIA PEACHES

 Southern Peaches

Like most fruits, peaches originated in China and arrived in the United States via the Middle East and Europe. Tender, juicy and aromatic, peaches are thought of as a southern fruit, but California and New Jersey grow huge crops as well. In fact, any temperate area with a long enough growing season will produce peaches, and peaches grown in your area and picked fully ripe are usually your top choice. Of all the places they're grown, though, I think Georgia and the Carolinas still produce the best.Most of us have no idea how much fuzz peaches have to begin with. Even though they've still got fuzz on them, 90 percent of it has been removed by the time you buy peaches at the market. When I was a kid, New Jersey was about 60 per cent farmland. We bought peaches from a man named Francis Johnson, who had a peach farm four or five towns away from us in Ramsey. I used to go there with my father to pick up peaches for our stand. Although the packing barn was a big red barn, it made me think of a white castle. Peach fuzz covered the whole barn; it was all over the place, completely blanketing the rafters in white, and drifts of fuzz were piled high. Those years are long gone, but they are great memories of my youth and i wish i could go back again and enjoy those wonderful summer days.

 

Season


Peaches are definitely a summer fruit, with the peak of the season beginning in late July and running through early September. In the winter there are imports from Chile, but because ripe peaches are so fragile, they’re nearly always picked green and have very little flavor. For the best peaches, wait until they’re in season in your area, then, get your fill. Peeled, sliced peaches freeze well, so you can put some away to enjoy when good fresh peaches aren’t available.


Selecting


When choosing peaches; use your eyes and your nose. Choose brightly colored fruit without traces of green, without bruising, and with a plump, smooth skin that shows no sign of wrinkling or withering. A really ripe peach will have a good fragrance.


Storing


Peaches picked hard-ripe but with good color will ripen if you leave them out on the counter, unrefrigerated, for two or three days or put them in a brown paper bag to hasten the process. Don’t refrigerate until they’re fully ripe, and then don’t keep them in the refrigerator for more than a day or two. Like nectarines, peaches lose juice and flavor if they’re refrigerated too long.


Peach Sizing


The sizing system used for California peaches is derived from the original method of place packing tree fruit into layers deep in a wooden lug. Today this type of container is referred to as a two-layer, tray-packed or "panta-pak" box. Peach size designations are based on the number of pieces of fruit, which can be placed in this two-layer, tray-packed box. For example, there are 56 pieces of fruit in a two-layer, tray-packed box of size 56 peaches. Through the years, the industry has developed a number of additional pack styles including loose-packed volume-fill boxes, consumer bags, single-layer trays and metric boxes. To accommodate every pack style, the sizing system used by the industry today is regulated according to the maximum number of nectarines in a 16-pound sample. Weigh-counts are set for each size designation and are regulated by the industry through third-party inspection at time of packing. Approximate minimum diameters have been determined for each size designation, but the true standard of size is the weight-count sample. California peaches, regulated by federal marketing orders, have been inspected to ensure fruit meets minimum weight-counts for the designated size. 


Terminology


Shoulders - The bulge surrounding the stem basin. Shoulders become full and well rounded as the fruit matures on the tree. Background Color - The yellow color on the skin of peaches and nectarines is the key to determining fruit ripeness. Look for bright yellow to orange colors with no hint of green to indicate a mature piece of fruit. Blush - The red or bright orange blush on a peach or nectarine is caused by exposure of the fruit to sunlight. This lends a more appealing look to the fruit, but is NOT an indication of ripeness or maturity. Blush may cover anywhere from 10 percent to 100 percent of the fruit surface depending on variety. Blossom End (tip) - The end opposite the stem. This is often the first part of the fruit to soften when ripe. Suture - A structural line running from the stem to the blossom end of the fruit. The suture may develop as a cleft or a prominent bulge depending on variety. Cheek - The sides of the fruit on either side of the suture. The cheeks of well- matured fruit should be plump. Pit or Stone - The pit or stone (seed) supports the fruit as it hangs from the stem and provides the conduit for nutrients from the tree as the fruit grows. The flesh adheres to the pit in "clingstone" varieties and is easily separated from the pit in "freestone" varieties. Flesh - The edible inside portion of a peach or nectarine. It can vary slightly in color, but traditional varieties normally have yellow or orange colored flesh. Some varieties may have a darker red flesh radiating from the pits as the fruit matures and ripens. "White flesh" varieties, as the name implies, will have a much paler, almost white appearance. 

 

Preparation Tips and Facts


Once fruit is soft, it can be stored in the refrigerator for a week or more. Depending on the variety, ripe fruit will last for about a week in the refrigerator. But make sure it's ripe before you put it in. Again, an ordinary paper bag is all you need to get your tree fruit really ripe, every time. Never leave fruit in a plastic bag. Keeping fruit in a plastic bag will hasten decay and can produce off-flavors. Keep fruit away from the windowsill. Setting fruit on or near your window sill in direct sunlight can cause it to shrivel. High heat actually damages tree fruit. How to peel peaches. Put them in boiling water for 10 seconds or until the skins split. Plunge them into ice water to cool and prevent cooking. The skins will slip right off. How to prevent browning on the fruits' cut surfaces. Dip slices of fruit in a mixture of 1 cup water and 1 tablespoon lemon juice or simply squeeze fresh lemon juice over cut surfaces. Peaches  belong to the rose family. 


Ripen Fruit in a Paper Bag 


It's easy to ripen firm peaches ,Simply place the fruit inside a paper bag, loosely close the top and keep it at room temperature for a day or two. As peaches  ripen they give off a natural hormone called ethylene. The paper bag traps the ethylene close to the fruit, while still allowing for the exchange of air into and out of the bag. Plastic bags will not work and can cause off-flavors in the fruit.  REMEMBER; NEVER PLACE FIRM PEACHES IN THE REFRIGERATOR. This can cause a type of damage called "internal breakdown." If you've ever had a dry or mealy peach, you've experienced "internal breakdown" and it's caused by storing fruit at the wrong temperatures. This can happen in your home refrigerator or at your grocer store. Once fruit is soft and gives to gentle palm pressure, it may be stored in the refrigerator for several days without damage. That's really all there is to it! 

 Click link below for Southern Peach Show

 https://www.nbcnewyork.com/on-air/as-seen-on/Produce-Pete_-Southern-Peaches_New-York-510705982.html 


About Produce Pete

image45

 Managed and operated a family owned farm/produce business for retail, wholesale, and fruit baskets. Pete has been in the produce business his whole life, and started out selling produce off the back of a truck at auctions and at his parents' roadside stand. Pete's family has been in business since 1953 at the same location in Bergenfield, New Jersey. From 1971 - 1997 Pete owned and operated this family "seasonal" business that includes at Christmas - Christmas trees, wreaths, and fruit baskets. During Easter we sell various plants, gourmet baskets and fruit baskets - Mother's Day - plants, fresh cut flowers, fruit baskets. At Halloween - pumpkins, corn stalks, etc. The produce store is open between April and December with retail, wholesale, and fruit baskets.

"KNOW A LITTLE ABOUT A LOT". JACK OF ALL TRADES MASTER OF NONE.....

In January 1998 he turned over the business to his son Peter Charles making him the 3rd generation to own Napolitano's Produce. In April of 2006, Napolitano's Produce closed it's doors after 53 years, a sad day but everything comes to an end. I would like to thank all the faithful customers who shopped my family store over the past 53 years. It was a privilege serving you. In June 2000 - he started as a Fruit & Vegetable Buyer for S. Katzman Produce at Hunts Point Market, Bronx, New York.Pete comes from a large family with his father being the 20th child - "That's why we are in the food business".

  • In April 1989, with the Chilean grape scare, he was hired by "People Are Talking" WORTV Channel 9, super station - nationwide - 150 markets - 24 million viewers and became "Pete Your Produce Pal" on daily five days a week.
  • In December 1990 hired by NBC for "House Party" as "Pete the Prince of Produce". Group W
  • In September 1991 hired by WORTV Channel 9 for "Nine Broadcast Plaza" as "Pete Your Produce Pal".
  • In September 1992 hired by WNBC Channel 4 "Weekend Today in New York" show with 52 week contract as "Produce Pete" / "Pete Your Produce Pal". (Been there ever since)
  • In 1994 he wrote a book about produce tips called "Produce Pete's Farmacopeia" - William Morrow, publisher
  • In September 1995 Discovery Channel - "Home Matters"
  • In January 1997 CNBC - "Steals and Deals"
  • In January 1998 Bionova Produce / Masters Touch Spokesperson
  • In January 2000 NBC - Ainsley Harriot Show (National - Buena Vista)
  • In February 2000 Woman's Home Network with Joan Lunden
  • In September 2000 hired by WCAU Philadelphia 10 as Produce Pete (Sunday & Wednesday Segments)
  • In February 2001 - Pathmark Supermarkets - Spokesperson
  • Guest on numerous Radio and Television shows.
  • In February 2001 "Produce Pete's Farmacopeia"- Republished by iuniverse.com
  • In July 2004 - The View (ABC 7)
  • In February 2005- Bella Vita Spokesperson (In Italy)
  • In July 2006 - NBC Today Show (Nationally)
  • In August 2007 Italian American Network (Produce Pete picks of the week)
  • Numerous Weekend Farmers Market Appearances throughout new jersey
  • 2011 New York State Farm Aid 
  • 2012 Horizon Blue Cross and Blue Shield Healthcare Event
  • 2013 Paramus Farmers Market, Ramsey Farmers Market, Nutley Farmers Market
  • 2013 Horizon BlueCross , Moorestown NJ
  • 2013-2017 NBC Health Fair New York Giants Health And Fitness Exbo
  • 2014-2015  Dr Oz Show Appearance
  • 2014-2015 Northern New Jersey Farmers Markets
  • 2016 Business Expo"Taste of the Gold Coast' 
  • 2017 Sparta Farmers Market
  • 2016-2017 Meet and Greet Donaldsons Farm Hackettstown 
  • 2013-2017 Chester Harvest Celebration Meet and Greet
  • 2017 Westchester Food Bank An Evening Of Good Taste
  • Appeared at D'Agostino, King's Culinary Arts Cooking Schools, Macy's and Bloomingdale's Cooking Classes.
  • Because of obesity and fast foods in schools Pete has been asked to speak at numerous grammer and high schools about healthy eating and his love for produce.

image46
image47

Contact Us

Ask your question

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Produce Pete's