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Sit Down With Produce Pete

 

NBC's ' Produce Pete'  sits down to talk about food access issues, the New York Green Cart Initiative and his own beginnings as a street vendor.  He appears in the film THE APPLE PUSHERS (www.applepushers.com).

 

Produce Pete at Hunts Point Market, Bronx NY

 

Produce Pete NBC food contributor, talks produce with Hank Zona at the Hunts Point produce market

Pat & Pete at Eden Garden, South Orange

Pat and Produce Pete out for a fun day at Eden Garden Marketplace.  Pat's getting better at picking fresh fruits and vegetables then i am.

Produce Pete With Hank Zona At Katzman Produce

Produce Pete and Hank inside the refrigerator at Katzman Produce at the Hunts Point Market in the Bronx talking vegetables.

Produce Pete's WNBC Shows, Past and Present

To see Produce Pete's shows please click the link below !!!

https://www.nbcnewyork.com/on-air/as-seen-on/Produce-Pete-151185725.html?page=1                              


!!!  Links to shows also available at bottom of page for shows listed !!!


JEOPARDY

http://j-archive.com/showgame.php?game_id=1170




CLICK ON LINK ABOVE.  PRODUCE PETE A CATEGORY ON JEOPARDY??  WHO WOULD HAVE GUESSED!

UPCOMING PRODUCE PETE APPEARANCES

GUEST SPEAKER AT THE COMPREHENSIVE BEHAVIORAL HEALTHCARE'S CULINARY ADVENTURE  ON JUNE 4TH, 2018. TRULY A NIGHT TO REMEMBER FOR A GREAT CAUSE

TEXAS GRAPEFRUIT SHOW 02/24/18

Texas Ruby Red Grapefruit

          

Texas Ruby Red Grapefruit

Have you ever wondered where grapefruit got its name? Our best guess is that the name comes from the way grapefruit grows--in clusters just like grapes, sometimes as many as twenty-five fruits in a cluster hanging from a tree. 

Hybrid grapefruit are wonderfully different from the original grapefruit, which can still be found occasionally n Oriental markets. Called pomelos or shadocks, these tend to be larger than grapefruit, with rough, puffy, thick rinds and lots of seeds. In most cases they're also quite sour and have very little juice. For my money, today's hybrid grapefruit is a vast improvement. 

Grapefruit are grown in many parts of the world, but the United States is the main producer and consumer. Florida produces 75 percent of the domestic crop, with Texas a distant second, followed by California and Arizona. 

Grapefruit was introduced to Florida in the early 1800's. For a hundred years it was sold chiefly to tourists as a curiosity. Not until the turn of the century were the first limited supplies shipped to northern cities. Grapefruit are now shipped to all parts of the United States and Canada, as well as to Europe and the Near and Far East. 

Florida grapefruit are grown in two areas: in central Florida and in the Indian River area on the eastern coast, where the soil and climate are perfect for grapefruit. The Indian River valley runs parallel to the Gulf Stream and the warm ocean current shields the groves from temperature changes and spares them from frost even when groves much farther south are damaged. 

There is a difference between California and Florida grapefruit. Florida grapefruit have a thinner rind and are sweeter and less pulpy than the California varieties. California grapefruit, which are in the stores in late summer and fall, are easier to peel and segment, but their flavor is only fair--the flesh just isn't as heavy with sweet juice as the Florida fruit. 

Grapefruit with a clear yellow rind are called goldens; those with some bronzing are bronzes, and those with heavy bronzing are called russets. Flesh color runs from yellow-white to pink to nearly red. Although their colors vary, there's not much difference in their flavor and juiciness. Those qualities are determined by the lateness of the season, the specific variety, and how the fruit has been handled. Duncans and orchids--old top-of- the-line varieties--are juicy and sweet; they are excellent for segmenting and make a great juice. The Duncans now grown only in limited supplies and sold to canneries and processors, but a descendant of the Duncan--the Marsh seedless--has taken its place. It's not quite as juicy as the Duncan, but it has a fine flavor and texture. From the Marsh seedless, hybridizers have developed a pink Marsh, and from that a darker pink strain called the Ruby Red, a very good grapefruit now primarily grown in Texas. The large Marsh rubies from Florida are now called Star Rubies, and they're probably the sweetest of all--great for segmenting, juicing, or eating with a spoon. Red grapefruit has twenty-five times more vitamin A than Golden, but otherwise they are almost nutritionally equal. 

Season

Grapefruit are available year round, but the best fruit--from Florida and Texas--are found between November and June, with the peak starting around Christmas and continuing through April. Small early golden and pink grapefruit are the first to show up on the market in October. They're very juicy but not as sweet as they are later in the season. Don't be afraid to buy a small grapefruit; even in the fall they make good juice, and as the season progresses into winter and early spring, the smaller varieties get sweeter even as they maintain their high juice content. Whether they're large or small, the Florida and Texas crops improve in quality from October to December and are at their sweetest and juiciest in late winter and early spring. 

In late July, California and Arizona grapefruit start to arrive and continue through October, but at best they're only pretty good--not as high in quality as the fruit from Florida and Texas. During the midsummer months, grapefruit also become pretty costly. Here again the old rule of thumb applies the higher the price, the lower the quality. In the summer months, forgo that breakfast grapefruit and replace it with seasonal berries and fruits. 

Selecting

Look for smooth, thin-skinned fruits that are either round or slightly flattened at each end. Like other citrus fruits, grapefruit should be firm, shiny, and heavy in the hand for its size. Fruit that's heavy for its size promises the most juice, and because grapefruits are almost three-quarters liquid, juiciness always means flavor. Avoid coarse, rough looking, or puffy fruit or any that has a puffy or protruding end, which indicates that the fruit is dry and flavorless. 

Storing

Leave grapefruit on the counter if you're going to consume it in less than a week; for longer storage, refrigerate.


FLORIDA GRAPEFRUIT FORCAST

The forecast for all-grapefruit production is unchanged at 4.65 million boxes, down 40% than last seasons production , and is the least recorded since the 1918-1919 season. Florida's groves are experiencing continued difficulty with volume because of the effects of Hurricane Irma.


TEXAS GRAPEFRUIT IN PEAK PRODUCTION

Consumption is on the rise, higher then  last year even for Texas fruit, 

due to the supply shortage due to Hurricane Irma in Florida. Peak sweetness will continue until March. Weather has been cooperative to this point in the season, and volume is moving nicely. Quality is good, with grapefruit size slightly above average due to the rains in October.  Prices are higher due to demand, you know what i always told you , Supply and Demand equals Price.


PREPARING


Grapefruit is great on its own, but if you want to sweeten a particularly tart fruit, sprinkle the halves with a little brown or whit sugar and a dot of butter and put them in a shallow baking dish under the broiler for a minute or two, until the tops glaze and start to bubble. 

Peeled and sectioned grapefruit is excellent in a salad of mixed mild and bitter greens with a light dressing. 

KENT MANGO SHOW 02/17/18

Sweet and Delicious, Mangoes are Rich in Vitamins and Minerals

  


When I see a mango, I think of my father, Pete. He loved mangoes and had no problem eating them, but he could never stand next to a mango tree because he would break out in hives. Something on the tree while they were growing triggered that response. I guess we’ll never know!

America’s awareness of mangoes has definitely been on the rise. I’ve lectured about different fruits and vegetables at schools for a long time and years ago, when I’d hold up a mango and ask the kids what it was, most would say an apple. But all that’s changed now based on the number of American children hailing from different parts of the world, as well as because of the mango’s increasing popularity.


ORIGINS AND BENEFITS


The mango originated in Southeast Asia, where it’s been grown for over 4,000 years, and since then has spread to many tropical and subtropical settings where the climate is conducive to the mango’s success. Mango trees are evergreens that will grow to 60 feet tall and require hot, dry periods to set and produce a good crop. Today there are over 1,000 different varieties of mangoes throughout the world. In India, the mango tree plays a sacred role as a symbol of love, and some also believe that the mango tree can grant wishes.

A comfort food, mangoes really can make you feel better. Rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, mangoes contain an enzyme with stomach-soothing properties similar to the papain found in papayas, which acts as a digestive aid. Mangoes are high in fiber and are also an excellent source of vitamins A and C, as well as potassium and beta carotene.


SELECTION AND STORAGE


Handle a mango very gently, as it bruises easily. Pick it up and gently press your thumb against the flesh — it should have a little give and a really sweet smell. A very ripe mango will often have some black speckling outside; don’t worry about that or about a little bruising, but avoid mangoes that are black all over, as they’re beyond the point of no return. I think mangoes that weigh a pound to a pound and a half have the sweetest taste.

Always use your nose when you’re choosing mangoes — 99percent of the time, a mango that smells wonderful tastes wonderful. If the stem end smells sour or acidic, reject it. If a mango is firm and green, it won’t have any smell, but if it looks good, bring it home and ripen it yourself.

Leave a firm, unripe mango out on the counter for a few days until it colors, develops a sweet aroma, and “gives” when you press it very gently. But never refrigerate a mango. If you must have it chilled, you can put it in the refrigerator for a few minutes, but I think mangoes taste best at room temperature. In any event, storing a mango below 50 degrees for any length of time will take the flavor out.


PREPARATION


Mangoes are great simply peeled and eaten as is or with a squeeze of lime juice (but don’t eat the peel — it’s bitter). Unlike many fruits, they’re slow to discolor when they’re sliced, which helps them make and retain a nice presentation. They make a beautiful tropical salad sliced with pineapple chunks, kiwi, papaya, banana, or just about any tropical fruit; I like to add a little squeeze of lime and some shredded coconut, too. For a refreshing and very nutritious tropical drink, purée some sliced mango with banana, pineapple and a squeeze of lime and enjoy!

Because mangoes have a large and nonfreestanding stone right in the center of the fruit that’s difficult to remove, people always ask me how to cut and eat a mango. Following, I’ve shared the results of my years of experience to help you get greater access to this fantastic fruit. Hope this makes it easier for you to enjoy this burst of sunshine!

How to eat a mango

To deal with the pit in the center, take two lengthwise cuts on either side of where you figure the pit is; if it’s a flattish mango, turn it up so a narrow side is facing you. The pit is large but fairly flat, so make the cuts no more than half an inch on either side of an imaginary center line. You’ll have three slices, the center one with the pit in it.

Now take the two outside slices and score the flesh with the tip of a knife, getting as close to the skin as you can without breaking it. Hold the scored slice in two hands and gently push up from the skin side, which will pop inside out. The segments of mango will separate and can easily be scooped off the skin with a spoon or butter knife. Add a sprinkle of lime juice if you like.

As for the slice with the pit, you can discard it if you have the willpower, but I personally find the flesh around the pit to be the tastiest part. All I can say is that the best way to eat it is to remove the strip of skin around it, pick it up with your fingers, stand over the sink, and enjoy!


KENT MANGO STORY

 

Kents tend to be softer when ripe than other round varietals seen in the USA. They can also be a bit more wrinkly when ripe, often a deterrent to the end user, so education is very important in their merchandising. It also tends to be more juicy or succulent in comparison to the Tommy Atkins or the Haden, probably an attribution of their yellow mango roots, which are often more juicy. These extremely succulent, juicy mangoes have a deep golden flesh when ripe, much more so than any other mango. They tend to be on the large size spectrum, and in terms of skin, they often exhibit slight red, yellows and eventually golden and orange blush tones. They have white speckles, as the Haden, but as the Kents ripen their speckles become more predominant.

The Kent cultivar has certainly been passed around the world; it is the predominant mango produced in Ecuador and Peru for export to the USA, and one of the main cultivar produced in South Africa (another leading world mango exporter) and it’s the prized import mango in France and other European countries.

Originating from Florida in the 1940's, Kents are ideal mangos for juicing and drying.

FLAVOR: Sweet and rich

TEXTURE: Juicy, tender flesh with limited fibers

COLOR: Dark green and often has a dark red blush over a small portion of the mango

SHAPE: Large oval shape

RIPENING CUES: Kents have yellow undertones or dots that cover more of the mango as it ripens. Squeeze gently to judge ripeness.

PRIMARY SOURCE COUNTRIES: Mexico, Ecuador, Peru

PEAK AVAILABILITY: January, February, June to Aug, and December
 

 What are Kent variety Mangos like? Featuring a mostly dark green skin with small patches of red blush, Kent Mangos have gold to orange flesh that is both sweet and rich, and is less fibrous and less stringy than the Tommy Atkins.


How do I know if this Mango is ripe?


The amount of redness on the skin is not an indicator of sweetness or ripeness with the Kent variety Mango. These Mangos do not give much in the way of visual clues to when they are ripe, so judge by the softness when you squeeze them. Ripen Mangos at room temperature.


Squeeze Gently to Test Ripeness on Kent variety Mangos

  1. Hard = flesh will be firm and crunchy inside, slightly astringent
  2. Slight Give = ripe enough for sweet flavor and creamy flesh
  3. Almost Soft = fully ripe, very juicy, very sweet
  4. Very Soft = over-ripe, perhaps discolored inside

Click on Link for Mango Show!!!


 https://www.nbcnewyork.com/on-air/as-seen-on/Produce-Pete-151185725.html







Valentines Day Stem Strawberries 02/10/18

California Strawberries

 

You've probably seen them in the produce section, but how are "long stem" strawberries any different from the normal quart of strawberries that you typically buy for 3 or 4 bucks? Boasting a deliciously red, plump body with a firm, long stem, these strawberries are perfect for, chocolate dipping, gift-giving, or simply creating a pretty presentation. 

Long stem strawberries are, as the name implies, the plumpest, firmest strawberries of the bunch, adorned with a fancy long stem... the same fancy long stem that is typically trimmed from strawberries before they hit the produce section. This nice little accessory makes it extremely easy to dip them in chocolate, roll them around in pretty toppings, or dangle them in front of the eyes of your loved ones.


Long stem strawberries are available year-round, however they’re particularly popular in the winter months, because they make the perfect gift for the holidays and especially Valentine’s Day (alongside a bouquet of long stem roses, obviously). Let it be clear, there is nothing different about the biology of a long stem strawberry versus a no-stem one, other than the fact that long stem berries are harvested with the intention of maintaining the structure and integrity of the stem the berry grows on in nature. If you’re buying berries with the intention of dipping and garnishing them, you can always opt for a quick shortcut and simply pierce your regulary strawberries with a toothpick, allowing for a more easily maneuvered dipping experience.


      

If there is any such thing as an all-American fruit, it's strawberries. They're our most popular dessert fruit. In most places local strawberries have a very short season. You can, of course, buy them year round, but like a lot of good things, the best strawberries are still the ones you get locally during those few brief weeks that they're in season. 

The first refrigerated shipment of strawberries in this country was made in 1843, when 40,000 quarts were shipped out of Cincinnati. That's a lot of strawberries. But in 1992, California shipped more than 5,160,000 quarts every day. More than 300,000 acres of strawberries are now cultivated worldwide - half of them in the United States. California is the biggest producer, and I think it grows the best commercially produced strawberries. We also get strawberries from Florida, New Zealand, Argentina, and Chile. Mexico and Guatemala also grow them, but I don't think they have much flavor. 

Varieties

Although there a different strawberry strains, there are three basic types: wild strawberries (often called fraises des bois), commercially grown hybrids, and local strawberries. I put locals into a separate category because, compared to strawberries grown and shipped from California and Florida, local strawberries - picked ripe by hand and sold close to home - taste totally different. 

For hundreds of year’s wild strawberries were the only ones available. They're most frequently found in alfalfa and clover fields, where they seem to grow best. Very tiny, with a tart, delicate flavor, wild strawberries show up in late June in most places. 

Although wild strawberries are native to the Americas, most commercially grown berries are produced from hybrids first developed in France, where wild strawberries imported from Virginia were planted next to yellow Chilean strawberries. These varieties cross-pollinated to produce a sweet red berry several times larger than its wild cousin. 

A local strawberry is simply any strawberry grown and sold not far from where you are. They're ripened right on the plant and picked by hand. Vine-ripened berries are darker and sweeter than shipped berries, but they're very, very fragile. Local strawberries are picked early every morning, when the dew is still on them. The whole season lasts only about three weeks - usually from mid-June to early July. But too much rain in June can ruin the entire crop. One year there were heavy rains in our part of New Jersey during strawberry season, and we had strawberries for only two days! So when those ripe local berries appear at your market, grab 'em. 

Commercial cultivars are bred to be firmer and heartier than most varieties so that they'll stand up to shipping. And, of course, they're shipped under refrigeration, which is an absolute necessity. Strawberries are an exception to my no-refrigeration rule. They must be refrigerated. 

Right now the top-of-the-line commercially grown strawberry is the Driscoll Stern. It's the great big one with the stem cut long. It looks spectacular and is good for desserts like chocolate fondue. But I still look for small berries: I think they have the best flavor. 

Selecting

When you're selecting strawberries, look for bright, deep red, glossy berries with fresh green caps, leaves, and stems. They should also be dry. Look at the bottom of the box: there should be no red stains or seepage showing. And, of course, stay away from berries that have turned dull and bluish. They're goners. 

Storing

Rule 1: Refrigerate
Rule 2: Refrigerate
Rule 3: Refrigerate 

Strawberries, like most other berries, won't ripen any further once they're pulled from the vine. Nothing you can do at home will make a green berry ripen. And once the berry cap is pulled, it will deteriorate very quickly. You can hold ripe strawberries in the refrigerator a day or two and still have pretty good berries, but the best thing to do is to eat strawberries the same day you buy them. 

Preparing

Just as important: store the strawberries untouched. Never, ever wash or remove the strawberry cap until you're ready to eat the berry. Then just wash the berries with a gentle spray of cool water and remove the caps after the berries have drained. 

The no-touch rule also holds if you're planning to freeze the berries. Just pop them into a plastic bag and put them into the freezer unwashed and uncapped. Rinse briefly and remove the caps only when you're ready to serve. 

Season

Wild Strawberries: early June, where available
Local Strawberries: in most areas, mid-June and early July
California Strawberries: January through November, with peak in March through May
Florida Strawberries: December through May, with peak in March and April
Imports: from New Zealand and Chile, November through April; from Mexico and Guatemala, early spring 



 STRAWBERRY FUN FACTS

 

  • Over 53 percent of seven to nine year olds picked strawberries as their favorite fruit.
  • Eight strawberries will provide 140 percent of the recommended daily intake of Vitamin C for kids.
  • Native forms of strawberries adapt to various climates and are indigenous to every major continent except Africa, Australia and New Zealand.
  • The fruit size of the very early strawberries was very small.
  • Seventy per cent of a strawberry's roots are located in the top three inches of soil.
  • Strawberries are the first fruit to ripen in the spring.
  • One cup of strawberries is only 55 calories.
  • There is a museum in Belgium just for strawberries.
  • Strawberries are a member of the rose family.
  • The flavor of a strawberry is influenced by weather, the variety and stage of ripeness when harvested.
  • On average, there are 200 seeds in a strawberry.
  • Ninety-four per cent of United States households consume strawberries.
  • According to the United States Department of Agriculture, the annual per capita consumption of fresh and frozen strawberries is 4.85 pounds.
  • Strawberries are grown in every state in the United States and every province of Canada.
  • California produces 75 percent of the nation's strawberry crops. According to the California Strawberry Advisory Board, California strawberries are available January through November, with peak quality and supply from March to May.
  • If all the strawberries produced in California in one year were laid berry to berry, they would go around the world 15 times.
  • California produces an amazing one billion pounds of strawberries each year.
  • Each acre of land in California in strawberry production produces an average of 21 tons of strawberries annually.
  • 23,000 acres of strawberries are planted in California each year.
  • Lebanon, Oregon's annual strawberry festival is home to the world's largest strawberry shortcake.
  • Americans eat 3.4 pounds of fresh strawberries each year plus another 1.8 pounds frozen per capita. Although strawberries are available in many forms—frozen, jam and jelly, and ice cream— nothing compares to the taste of a fresh vine ripened strawberry.
  • Strawberries are delicate, requiring gentle handling to prevent bruising. With today's shipping technology, strawberries are available year round, but at a cost. Commercial growers have produced resilient hybrid berries known for their shipping quality.
  • Florida is second in production. The Florida season runs from December to May and peaks during March and April. To meet the demand, winter strawberries are usually imported between November and May.

Click on Link for Show !!!  https://www.nbcnewyork.com/on-air/as-seen-on/Produce-Pete-Long-Stem-Strawberries_New-York-473684683.html

HASS AVOCADOS SHOW 02/03/18

Check out our great Guacamole Recipes on Bette's Recipe

  

Ever since I was a kid, I've always been a fan of football and Super Bowl Sunday. My father, not so much.

As an Italian immigrant, he worked hard at our family produce store in Bergenfield, N.J. and just couldn't understand the point of a bunch of guys throwing a ball around and getting piled on and shoved to the ground once they caught it.

I was a big kid in high school and I'll never forget one day when the football coach stopped me in the hallway and suggested I go out for the football team. I told him that I'd love to but that I had to work after school in my father's store, to which he said he'd call my father and tell him that I had my whole life to work.

I already knew what Pop's answer would be, but I told him to knock himself out anyway and gave him the store phone number.

Sure enough, a couple of days later the football coach informed me that he'd called Pop and that after asking him about my playing football, Pop asked him how much was he going to pay me.

That was Pop for you, born in a different country with a different set of rules. Back then, I thought he was always wrong, but you know what they say — the older you get, the smarter your parents get.

Pop's long gone and so are his way of life, his values and his willingness to work hard seven days a week, but boy do I miss him and those days. Pop, I hope you can try to enjoy the Super Bowl and eat plenty of avocados!


DID YOU KNOW ?


- Though people think that avocado sales peak on holidays like the Fourth of July or Cinco de Mayo, avocados actually experience their greatest demand on Super Bowl Sunday.

- In fact, Americans are expected to eat some 200 million pounds of avocados (about 400 million individual avocados) in the run-up to and on this year's Super Bowl Sunday, up from 2017

- This total would be enough to fill a football field end zone more than 53 feet deep with avocados — 10 feet over the goal posts!

- While many consider them a delicious but fattening treat, avocados contain healthy unsaturated fat, are loaded with vitamins A, C and E as well as beneficial antioxidants, and have one of the highest fiber contents of any fruit or vegetable.


ABOUT AVOCADOS


Above the equator, the avocado fruit blooms between February and May but is harvested year-round. Unlike most fruits, avocados don't have to be picked at certain times and can remain on the tree quite a while.

Like pears, avocados ripen only after they're picked and the firm fruits ship well. Patented in 1935 by postman Randolph Hass, California's dark green-to-purplish black Hass avocado has since become the most popular variety in the U.S. and accounts for the vast majority of California's crop.

This time of year, however, 80 % of the avocados available here hail from Mexico, a 100% increase from a decade ago.

When selecting, choose an avocado free of scars and wrinkles and don't squeeze the fruit or you'll bruise it. If the avocado is ripe, the stem will pull right out, but the best strategy is to buy avocados when they're still a bit green and firm and then ripen them at home by simply leaving them out on the counter for a few days.

To hasten the ripening process, put avocados in a paper bag or a drawer (some people think they ripen best wrapped in foil), and don't refrigerate avocados, as they can turn to mush in as little as a day.

Finally, avocado flesh exposed to the air will darken very quickly. Some people think that leaving the pit in with the avocado meat prevents discoloration, but the primary factor in preventing discoloration is keeping air away from the flesh, so wrap a cut avocado in plastic, refrigerate it, and use it as soon as possible.

Peeled and sliced avocados should be sprinkled with lemon or lime juice to retard discoloration, and the citric acid will also bring out the flavor.

To peel, cut the avocado lengthwise around the pit and then rotate the two halves in opposite directions. You can easily scoop the flesh out of the shell of a ripe avocado with a spoon, but in many cases the avocado will peel like a banana — just turn it over on the cut side and pull off the skin with your fingers.


PREPARATION


Avocados are great with a sprinkle of lemon or lime juice and salt. Mashed avocado is, of course, the primary ingredient in guacamole, and when you make it be sure to leave the pit in with the guacamole to keep it from turning brown; the pit is very effective in this application.

Avocado is also delicious served with slices of ripe red tomato or cut into slivers and added to tossed green salads.

For a pretty salad plate, cut avocados in half lengthwise, leaving skins on, and remove the pits; arrange on a bed of lettuce and fill the centers with crab, tuna, or chicken salad, garnishing with fresh raw vegetables and serving with bread if desired.

An avocado puréed with a little lemon juice, salt, other seasonings, and a dab of olive oil, makes a great creamy salad dressing for lettuce or other greens.

Avocados are also good on sandwiches — any combination of avocado, bacon, lettuce, tomato, turkey, or chicken makes a great sandwich.


   Click on link below for show !!

https://www.nbcnewyork.com/on-air/as-seen-on/Produce-Pete_-Avocados_New-York-472498833.html










RED LE ROUGE PEPPER SHOW 01/27/18

RED LE ROUGE PEPPERS

  

It seems hard to believe, but it wasn't so many years ago that red peppers were a rarity in the grocery store. You could find them only during a two- or three-week period each year, and you paid luxury prices for the privilege.


   Now, of course, red peppers are available year-round, and if they're not dirt-cheap, they're certainly reasonable. For that, you can thank Israeli scientists.


In the past, red peppers were green bell peppers that had reached the final stages of maturity.  As such, they were prone to a couple of notable shortcomings, not the least of which was that they had an extremely short season and shelf life.  Their flavor was good, but their flesh was weak and prone to spoilage problems.


Today's red peppers, "bred to be red." They turn colors much earlier and, once picked, they stay firm and crisp much longer--up to two weeks.  The trade-off is that the flavor is not the same.  The new varieties are sweeter, without the earthy undertones of the old-time reds.


Le Rouge red peppers were introduced by Indio-based agricultural conglomerate Sun World International in 1983.  The product of Israeli scientists at Ben Gurion University in Beersheba, Le Rouge is a cross of a regular blocky pepper with Bulgarian and cubanelle peppers.


"A blocky red bell is a green bell that is at the end of its life cycle.  "Once picked, a blocky bell doesn't have a lot of shelf life.  Le Rouge is bred to be red at peak maturity.  That means you have another seven to 14 days of shelf life after it has been picked."


Red Peppers are green at first.  Sweet peppers will mature to various colors with red being the most prominent color.  The green pepper that we eat is the immature version.  Like I said, most common varieties of bell peppers will turn from green to red, with other varieties turning yellow, purple, or even brown as the pepper matures.  As peppers mature their sugar content increases.  Some yellow varieties are the only color found in both immature and mature peppers. Red peppers have a real sweet flavor and green and yellow peppers have a mildly sweet, slightly spicy flavor. 


Colored peppers are grown in open fields, greenhouses, and shade houses. The quality, size and profile of the pepper is much more consistent when grown in greenhouses and shade houses. The protected environment is more costly to set up but the final product is a much better pepper. When a pepper is field grown you run the risk of bad weather, decreasing yield and exposure to diseases.


SELECTING


Look for Red Peppers that are fresh, firm, bright in color, thick-fleshed with a bright green calyx (stem). Pick up the pepper and shake it.  If you hear the seeds rattle inside, pass it by; that means the pepper is old.  Soft, pliable, thin-fleshed with a pale color indicates the peppers are old as well. 


STORING


Refrigerated in the crisper drawer, red peppers will keep for up to three or four days, but they will lose their crispness and turn limp in fairly short order.  Left at room temperature, they'll lose their crunch in a matter of hours.  Don't wash until you're ready to use them. Red peppers are low in calories, free of saturated fat, sodium free, cholesterol free, fat free, and high in antioxidant vitamin C. Red bell peppers are a versatile addition to any luncheon or dinner menu.

 

There are some really great deals on sweet red peppers available right now! Growers in Mexico are into their peak harvests fresh crop field-grown sweet red peppers. Sizing is big and prices are low compared to other times of year.

 

WHAT COLOR BELL PEPPER IS BETTER FOR YOU TO EAT ?


Choose red bell peppers for their high levels of antioxidant vitamins A and C which help protect cells from free radicals. One cup of chopped red peppers contains three times the minimum amount of vitamin C and nearly 100 percent of the vitamin A recommended for a typical 2,000 calorie-a-day diet. Green and yellow peppers fall short in vitamin A. All peppers are naturally fat free and low calorie, and they contain three grams of fiber per chopped cup, making them excellent snacks or mealtime fillers.


                              MY STORY , MOM AND HER STUFFED PEPPERS                       

          


When I was a youngster mom always made stuffed peppers, one of my favorite dishes, except for the anchovies, which was pop's favorite. She would put in black olives, bread crumbs, anchovies ( she would leave them out of mine), and meat if we were lucky and all her secret ingredients, boy I loved them. Now in those days they were made with green bell peppers or red bell peppers in the summertime , but mom she would make the stuffed peppers with what they called then, Italian Frying Peppers, now called Cubanelle Peppers. They were light green in color, with a very thin skin and not as harsh tasting as the green bell pepper which always gave me " AGITARE", an Italian - american slang word meaning to agitate, which it did giving me heartburn, indigestion, and an upset stomach. Starting in the mid 80's the RED LE ROUGE PEPPER starting hitting the stores, looking like a italian frying pepper but sweet. This made a great pepper for mom to use for stuffing. Now by then mom was getting on in years, so her stuffed peppers days was passed on to Bette, who took the reins and did a great job. It's funny and sad, moms gone a long time, but when I was thinking of what to do on this weeks show and I decided on RED LE ROUGE PEPPERS, mom's stuffed peppers came flowing out of me. Like I always say "FOOD AND MEMORIES,MEMORIES AND FOOD", they are just part of our being. Enjoy MOM and BETTE"S recipe, and I hope you have good memories that bring a smile or maybe a tear to your eye.


 Click on link for show !! https://www.nbcnewyork.com/on-air/as-seen-on/Produce-Pete_-Red-Peppers_New-York-471425194.html

About Produce Pete

 Managed and operated a family owned farm/produce business for retail, wholesale, and fruit baskets. Pete has been in the produce business his whole life, and started out selling produce off the back of a truck at auctions and at his parents' roadside stand. Pete's family has been in business since 1953 at the same location in Bergenfield, New Jersey. From 1971 - 1997 Pete owned and operated this family "seasonal" business that includes at Christmas - Christmas trees, wreaths, and fruit baskets. During Easter we sell various plants, gourmet baskets and fruit baskets - Mother's Day - plants, fresh cut flowers, fruit baskets. At Halloween - pumpkins, corn stalks, etc. The produce store is open between April and December with retail, wholesale, and fruit baskets.

"KNOW A LITTLE ABOUT A LOT". JACK OF ALL TRADES MASTER OF NONE.....

In January 1998 he turned over the business to his son Peter Charles making him the 3rd generation to own Napolitano's Produce. In April of 2006, Napolitano's Produce closed it's doors after 53 years, a sad day but everything comes to an end. I would like to thank all the faithful customers who shopped my family store over the past 53 years. It was a privilege serving you. In June 2000 - he started as a Fruit & Vegetable Buyer for S. Katzman Produce at Hunts Point Market, Bronx, New York.Pete comes from a large family with his father being the 20th child - "That's why we are in the food business".

  • In April 1989, with the Chilean grape scare, he was hired by "People Are Talking" WORTV Channel 9, super station - nationwide - 150 markets - 24 million viewers and became "Pete Your Produce Pal" on daily five days a week.
  • In December 1990 hired by NBC for "House Party" as "Pete the Prince of Produce". Group W
  • In September 1991 hired by WORTV Channel 9 for "Nine Broadcast Plaza" as "Pete Your Produce Pal".
  • In September 1992 hired by WNBC Channel 4 "Weekend Today in New York" show with 52 week contract as "Produce Pete" / "Pete Your Produce Pal". (Been there ever since)
  • In 1994 he wrote a book about produce tips called "Produce Pete's Farmacopeia" - William Morrow, publisher
  • In September 1995 Discovery Channel - "Home Matters"
  • In January 1997 CNBC - "Steals and Deals"
  • In January 1998 Bionova Produce / Masters Touch Spokesperson
  • In January 2000 NBC - Ainsley Harriot Show (National - Buena Vista)
  • In February 2000 Woman's Home Network with Joan Lunden
  • In September 2000 hired by WCAU Philadelphia 10 as Produce Pete (Sunday & Wednesday Segments)
  • In February 2001 - Pathmark Supermarkets - Spokesperson
  • Guest on numerous Radio and Television shows.
  • In February 2001 "Produce Pete's Farmacopeia"- Republished by iuniverse.com
  • In July 2004 - The View (ABC 7)
  • In February 2005- Bella Vita Spokesperson (In Italy)
  • In July 2006 - NBC Today Show (Nationally)
  • In August 2007 Italian American Network (Produce Pete picks of the week)
  • Numerous Weekend Farmers Market Appearances throughout new jersey
  • 2011 New York State Farm Aid 
  • 2012 Horizon Blue Cross and Blue Shield Healthcare Event
  • 2013 Paramus Farmers Market, Ramsey Farmers Market, Nutley Farmers Market
  • 2013 Horizon BlueCross , Moorestown NJ
  • 2013-2017 NBC Health Fair New York Giants Health And Fitness Exbo
  • 2014-2015  Dr Oz Show Appearance
  • 2014-2015 Northern New Jersey Farmers Markets
  • 2016 Business Expo"Taste of the Gold Coast' 
  • 2017 Sparta Farmers Market
  • 2016-2017 Meet and Greet Donaldsons Farm Hackettstown 
  • 2013-2017 Chester Harvest Celebration Meet and Greet
  • 2017 Westchester Food Bank An Evening Of Good Taste
  • Appeared at D'Agostino, King's Culinary Arts Cooking Schools, Macy's and Bloomingdale's Cooking Classes.
  • Because of obesity and fast foods in schools Pete has been asked to speak at numerous grammer and high schools about healthy eating and his love for produce.

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